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Between the Lines: The Jewish Museum, Berlin

Between the Lines: The Jewish Museum, Berlin 82 Between the Lines: The Jewish Museum, Berlin DANIEL LIBESKIND It seems to me that there is no way to camouflage the inability to speak about architecture coherently or from the beginning. The notion of an original point of departure, which presupposes a past, is in itself doubtful, because the past has never been experienced as being present. So I would rather skip the beginnings altogether and go straight to the middle, which in my case is the Berlin Museum with the Jewish Museum. But first I want to try to explain something about time-not only historical time, time in architecture, but also the time we are now living in. I came to the conclusion a while ago that when one is looking at time, looking at history, nothing seems to have taken place. One realizes that when one is looking at time, time is not playing along, time is not visible, so to speak, because one is looking for it. But then the minute you do not look for time you are transformed by it: suddenly it just happens overnight, so to speak, or between the drawings, or in between the works, that one has been completely http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

Between the Lines: The Jewish Museum, Berlin

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 22 (1): 82 – Jan 1, 1992

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1992 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916492X00089
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

82 Between the Lines: The Jewish Museum, Berlin DANIEL LIBESKIND It seems to me that there is no way to camouflage the inability to speak about architecture coherently or from the beginning. The notion of an original point of departure, which presupposes a past, is in itself doubtful, because the past has never been experienced as being present. So I would rather skip the beginnings altogether and go straight to the middle, which in my case is the Berlin Museum with the Jewish Museum. But first I want to try to explain something about time-not only historical time, time in architecture, but also the time we are now living in. I came to the conclusion a while ago that when one is looking at time, looking at history, nothing seems to have taken place. One realizes that when one is looking at time, time is not playing along, time is not visible, so to speak, because one is looking for it. But then the minute you do not look for time you are transformed by it: suddenly it just happens overnight, so to speak, or between the drawings, or in between the works, that one has been completely

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1992

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