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Between Niobe and Mary

Between Niobe and Mary To read one of Andrew Benjamin’s books is to plunge into the deep end of the philosophical pool. He has produced a large body of work, has covered a remarkable range of topics, and has carefully engaged an astonishing number of figures in the history of philosophy. So, my attempt now to say something about Towards a Relational Ontology1—which one can already no longer call Andrew Benjamin’s most recent book, since another, Virtue in Being,2 has already appeared—is in some sense a real effort to struggle with a long-standing and still on-going quite complex philosophical project. To consider this book properly one would need to situate it in the context of this larger project. But, with this confession of the limitations of my remarks, I will not try to scale that large project, but will turn instead to a special set of questions that seem to be at the heart of Benjamin’s aims in Towards a Relational Ontology. More precisely, I want to look more closely at his treatment of two figures, two women as presented in works of art: Niobe and Mary. Approaching the large project and very detailed arguments of Andrew Benjamin’s work in Towards a Relational http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

Between Niobe and Mary

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 47 (2): 9 – Jun 14, 2017

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/15691640-12341369
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

To read one of Andrew Benjamin’s books is to plunge into the deep end of the philosophical pool. He has produced a large body of work, has covered a remarkable range of topics, and has carefully engaged an astonishing number of figures in the history of philosophy. So, my attempt now to say something about Towards a Relational Ontology1—which one can already no longer call Andrew Benjamin’s most recent book, since another, Virtue in Being,2 has already appeared—is in some sense a real effort to struggle with a long-standing and still on-going quite complex philosophical project. To consider this book properly one would need to situate it in the context of this larger project. But, with this confession of the limitations of my remarks, I will not try to scale that large project, but will turn instead to a special set of questions that seem to be at the heart of Benjamin’s aims in Towards a Relational Ontology. More precisely, I want to look more closely at his treatment of two figures, two women as presented in works of art: Niobe and Mary. Approaching the large project and very detailed arguments of Andrew Benjamin’s work in Towards a Relational

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jun 14, 2017

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