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Better with the UN? Searching for Peace and Governance in Iraq

Better with the UN? Searching for Peace and Governance in Iraq Global Governance 10 (2004), 281–288 GLOBAL INSIGHTS Better with the UN? Searching for Peace and Governance in Iraq Greg Mills It was not our intention to go to Baghdad. And, had we done that, we would have gotten ourselves into the biggest quagmire you can imagine trying to sort out 2000 years of Mesopotamian history. —Colin Powell, 1991 A year has passed since the U.S.–led coalition invaded Saddam Hus- sein’s Iraq for the second time. In the buildup to war, many questioned the wisdom of embarking on military action without multilateral approval. This reluctance to support military intervention was built, in part, out of a fear of the impact of unilateral action on the spirit and practice of multilateralism—hence the efforts by the Bush administra- tion to attempt, albeit in vain, to secure Security Council approval. Few doubted the likely efficacy of the coalition military machine in toppling Hussein. The 1991 Gulf War, the various Balkans ventures, and the Afghanistan campaign had silenced most skeptics of the utility of high-technology weaponry even in asymmetric warfare. Even fewer would have argued that Iraq would not be a better place without Hus- sein’s—as indeed it is. And not many could have http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

Better with the UN? Searching for Peace and Governance in Iraq

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-01003003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Global Governance 10 (2004), 281–288 GLOBAL INSIGHTS Better with the UN? Searching for Peace and Governance in Iraq Greg Mills It was not our intention to go to Baghdad. And, had we done that, we would have gotten ourselves into the biggest quagmire you can imagine trying to sort out 2000 years of Mesopotamian history. —Colin Powell, 1991 A year has passed since the U.S.–led coalition invaded Saddam Hus- sein’s Iraq for the second time. In the buildup to war, many questioned the wisdom of embarking on military action without multilateral approval. This reluctance to support military intervention was built, in part, out of a fear of the impact of unilateral action on the spirit and practice of multilateralism—hence the efforts by the Bush administra- tion to attempt, albeit in vain, to secure Security Council approval. Few doubted the likely efficacy of the coalition military machine in toppling Hussein. The 1991 Gulf War, the various Balkans ventures, and the Afghanistan campaign had silenced most skeptics of the utility of high-technology weaponry even in asymmetric warfare. Even fewer would have argued that Iraq would not be a better place without Hus- sein’s—as indeed it is. And not many could have

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Aug 3, 2004

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