Behaviour of Lake Baikal amphipods as a part of the night migratory complex in the Kluevka settlement region (south-eastern Baikal)

Behaviour of Lake Baikal amphipods as a part of the night migratory complex in the Kluevka... INTRODUCTION The nocturnal migration processes that take place in the coastal pelagic zone of large water bodies are considerably different from those that occur in the open- and deep-water pelagic zones. In these open- and deep-water pelagic zones the most active and mobile groups of pelagic species are commonly observed undertaking diel vertical migrations (Vinogradov, 1970; Ringelberg, 2010, among others). By contrast, the migratory complex in the water column above shallower areas at night is composed of a different group of organisms. The migratory complex in marine ecosystems typically includes pelagic organisms approaching the coast, for example, the amphipod family Hyperiidae (Shulenberger, 1977; Williams & Robins, 1981; Elder & Seibel, 2015, among others), euphausiids (Iguchi & Ikeda, 2004), calanoids and other copepods (Vinogradov, 1970), as well as typical benthic organisms that temporarily rise into the pelagic zone, such as cartilaginous and bony fishes (Gauthier & Rose, 2002; Sims et al., 2006), amphipods, isopods, cumaceans, tanaidaceans (Saigusa & Oishi, 2000; Fernandez-Gonzalez et al., 2014, among others), chaetognaths (Nishihama & Hirakawa, 1998), and the free-swimming larvae of benthic invertebrates (e.g., sponges, coelenterates, polychaetes and echinoderms) (Mileykovsky, 1977, among others). All of these organisms have previously been identified as transiting this http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Crustaceana Brill

Behaviour of Lake Baikal amphipods as a part of the night migratory complex in the Kluevka settlement region (south-eastern Baikal)

Behaviour of Lake Baikal amphipods as a part of the night migratory complex in the Kluevka settlement region (south-eastern Baikal)


INTRODUCTION The nocturnal migration processes that take place in the coastal pelagic zone of large water bodies are considerably different from those that occur in the open- and deep-water pelagic zones. In these open- and deep-water pelagic zones the most active and mobile groups of pelagic species are commonly observed undertaking diel vertical migrations (Vinogradov, 1970; Ringelberg, 2010, among others). By contrast, the migratory complex in the water column above shallower areas at night is composed of a different group of organisms. The migratory complex in marine ecosystems typically includes pelagic organisms approaching the coast, for example, the amphipod family Hyperiidae (Shulenberger, 1977; Williams & Robins, 1981; Elder & Seibel, 2015, among others), euphausiids (Iguchi & Ikeda, 2004), calanoids and other copepods (Vinogradov, 1970), as well as typical benthic organisms that temporarily rise into the pelagic zone, such as cartilaginous and bony fishes (Gauthier & Rose, 2002; Sims et al., 2006), amphipods, isopods, cumaceans, tanaidaceans (Saigusa & Oishi, 2000; Fernandez-Gonzalez et al., 2014, among others), chaetognaths (Nishihama & Hirakawa, 1998), and the free-swimming larvae of benthic invertebrates (e.g., sponges, coelenterates, polychaetes and echinoderms) (Mileykovsky, 1977, among others). All of these organisms have previously been identified as transiting this zone (meroplanktonic organisms). Although Lake Baikal is one of the most unique freshwater ecosystems in the world, it has not been extensively studied. It was previously believed that in this massive lake, the migratory complex was composed only of pelagic species; however, it is now understood that some benthic organisms also can join the nocturnal migratory complex (Melnik et al., 1993; Takhteev et al., 2014). Among the typical pelagic crustaceans in the lake are endemic copepods, Epischura baicalensis Sars, 1900; pelagic Cyclops species (e.g., Cyclops...
Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/behaviour-of-lake-baikal-amphipods-as-a-part-of-the-night-migratory-TYYZg0lsUJ
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright 2016 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands.
Subject
Articles
ISSN
0011-216x
eISSN
1568-5403
D.O.I.
10.1163/15685403-00003530
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTION The nocturnal migration processes that take place in the coastal pelagic zone of large water bodies are considerably different from those that occur in the open- and deep-water pelagic zones. In these open- and deep-water pelagic zones the most active and mobile groups of pelagic species are commonly observed undertaking diel vertical migrations (Vinogradov, 1970; Ringelberg, 2010, among others). By contrast, the migratory complex in the water column above shallower areas at night is composed of a different group of organisms. The migratory complex in marine ecosystems typically includes pelagic organisms approaching the coast, for example, the amphipod family Hyperiidae (Shulenberger, 1977; Williams & Robins, 1981; Elder & Seibel, 2015, among others), euphausiids (Iguchi & Ikeda, 2004), calanoids and other copepods (Vinogradov, 1970), as well as typical benthic organisms that temporarily rise into the pelagic zone, such as cartilaginous and bony fishes (Gauthier & Rose, 2002; Sims et al., 2006), amphipods, isopods, cumaceans, tanaidaceans (Saigusa & Oishi, 2000; Fernandez-Gonzalez et al., 2014, among others), chaetognaths (Nishihama & Hirakawa, 1998), and the free-swimming larvae of benthic invertebrates (e.g., sponges, coelenterates, polychaetes and echinoderms) (Mileykovsky, 1977, among others). All of these organisms have previously been identified as transiting this

Journal

CrustaceanaBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2016

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off