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Babylonian Captivity

Babylonian Captivity 23 Babylonian Captivity JOHN SALLIS Vanderbilt University I hope it will not seem too perverse if I begin, not with architecture, but with its opposite. Not its only opposite of course, but nonetheless one for which today one might claim a certain privilege, thus calling it, with only the slightest, almost imperceptible mark of reservation, the opposite of architecture. And yet, my intent is anything but to insist on opposition. Who today could entertain even the slightest expectation of such opposites re- maining intact in their mere opposition? Who could fail to suspect a complic- ity between them, complicating and in a sense undermining their opposition, threatening the very sense of their opposition? Now that the lesson has been learned that even what is most familiar, even that with which we are most at home, turns around into, returns as, its opposite: Freud shows that "heimlich is a word the meaning of which develops in the direction of ambivalence, until it finally coincides with its opposite, unheimlich." Freud concludes: "Unheimlich is somehow a kind of heimlich."1 A strange logic, one that would allow a certain coincidence of opposites, yet without dissolving the opposi- tion or enclosing it within http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

Babylonian Captivity

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 22 (1): 23 – Jan 1, 1992

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1992 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916492X00034
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

23 Babylonian Captivity JOHN SALLIS Vanderbilt University I hope it will not seem too perverse if I begin, not with architecture, but with its opposite. Not its only opposite of course, but nonetheless one for which today one might claim a certain privilege, thus calling it, with only the slightest, almost imperceptible mark of reservation, the opposite of architecture. And yet, my intent is anything but to insist on opposition. Who today could entertain even the slightest expectation of such opposites re- maining intact in their mere opposition? Who could fail to suspect a complic- ity between them, complicating and in a sense undermining their opposition, threatening the very sense of their opposition? Now that the lesson has been learned that even what is most familiar, even that with which we are most at home, turns around into, returns as, its opposite: Freud shows that "heimlich is a word the meaning of which develops in the direction of ambivalence, until it finally coincides with its opposite, unheimlich." Freud concludes: "Unheimlich is somehow a kind of heimlich."1 A strange logic, one that would allow a certain coincidence of opposites, yet without dissolving the opposi- tion or enclosing it within

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1992

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