Auxin Inactivation Systems of Nemic Origin

Auxin Inactivation Systems of Nemic Origin AUXIN INACTIVATION SYSTEMS OF NEMIC ORIGIN BY D. R. VIGLIERCHIO and S. G. MJUGE 1) Department of Nematology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, U.S.A. Some fifteen plant-parasitic and fungal feeding nematodes obtained from field populations and greenhouse or laboratory cultures were investigated for their capacity to release auxins or auxin inactivating systems into their environment. Over half the nematode species tested did release a heat labile auxin inactivating system; none released detectable quantities of auxin. Auxin degrading enzymes appear quite commonly in plants and serve to regulate the auxin level within tissues (Pilet, 1961). Some nemic disease syndromes involve auxin related plant growth disorders; however, the role of nematodes in these interactions is poorly understood (Viglierchio, 1971; Giebel, 1974). Meloidogyne hapla and Ditylenchus dip.raci have been reported to produce a heat labile auxin inactivating system which, it was suggested, could explain in part the disease symp- tomology of each nematode (Viglierchio & Yu, 1965). Other IAA oxidizing systems have been implicated in the mechanism of host resistance to certain nema- todes (Giebel, 1970). The mechanism and characteristics of the host-parasite inter- actions, modifying the normal plant hormonal balance, is as yet largely a matter of speculation. To http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nematologica Brill

Auxin Inactivation Systems of Nemic Origin

Nematologica, Volume 21 (4): 471 – Jan 1, 1975

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1975 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0028-2596
eISSN
1875-2926
D.O.I.
10.1163/187529275X00248
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AUXIN INACTIVATION SYSTEMS OF NEMIC ORIGIN BY D. R. VIGLIERCHIO and S. G. MJUGE 1) Department of Nematology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, U.S.A. Some fifteen plant-parasitic and fungal feeding nematodes obtained from field populations and greenhouse or laboratory cultures were investigated for their capacity to release auxins or auxin inactivating systems into their environment. Over half the nematode species tested did release a heat labile auxin inactivating system; none released detectable quantities of auxin. Auxin degrading enzymes appear quite commonly in plants and serve to regulate the auxin level within tissues (Pilet, 1961). Some nemic disease syndromes involve auxin related plant growth disorders; however, the role of nematodes in these interactions is poorly understood (Viglierchio, 1971; Giebel, 1974). Meloidogyne hapla and Ditylenchus dip.raci have been reported to produce a heat labile auxin inactivating system which, it was suggested, could explain in part the disease symp- tomology of each nematode (Viglierchio & Yu, 1965). Other IAA oxidizing systems have been implicated in the mechanism of host resistance to certain nema- todes (Giebel, 1970). The mechanism and characteristics of the host-parasite inter- actions, modifying the normal plant hormonal balance, is as yet largely a matter of speculation. To

Journal

NematologicaBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1975

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