Attitudes toward Human Rights

Attitudes toward Human Rights The issue of human rights has gained attention in Taiwan, and this study represents a breakthrough regarding the use of an interdisciplinary research approach that includes a psychological focus. We utilized multiscale questionnaires to test the attitudes toward human rights from different perspectives. The results showed that the following: (1) The modal personalities of Taiwan, namely the authoritarian and dogmatic personalities, are not conducive to the development of human rights; (2) civil liberalism and globalism are good for the development of individual personalities, while patriotism and nationalism are not entirely bad, but support civil constraint; and (3) individuals in favor of civil liberalism are in the minority and face more difficulty in adapting to the Taiwanese environment. Our recommendation is that leaders who are strong in civil liberalism must be elected to encourage a culture of “obedience” and “disparate layout” for the development of human rights in Taiwan. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png African and Asian Studies Brill

Attitudes toward Human Rights

African and Asian Studies, Volume 14 (4): 337 – Dec 8, 2015

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1569-2094
eISSN
1569-2108
D.O.I.
10.1163/15692108-12341348
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The issue of human rights has gained attention in Taiwan, and this study represents a breakthrough regarding the use of an interdisciplinary research approach that includes a psychological focus. We utilized multiscale questionnaires to test the attitudes toward human rights from different perspectives. The results showed that the following: (1) The modal personalities of Taiwan, namely the authoritarian and dogmatic personalities, are not conducive to the development of human rights; (2) civil liberalism and globalism are good for the development of individual personalities, while patriotism and nationalism are not entirely bad, but support civil constraint; and (3) individuals in favor of civil liberalism are in the minority and face more difficulty in adapting to the Taiwanese environment. Our recommendation is that leaders who are strong in civil liberalism must be elected to encourage a culture of “obedience” and “disparate layout” for the development of human rights in Taiwan.

Journal

African and Asian StudiesBrill

Published: Dec 8, 2015

Keywords: attitudes toward human rights; civil liberalism; culture of obedience and disparate layout; macro and micro personalities; Taiwan human rights questionnaires

References

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