Asymmetry in Nematode Movement Patterns and Its Possible Significance in Orientation

Asymmetry in Nematode Movement Patterns and Its Possible Significance in Orientation ASYMMETRY IN NEMATODE MOVEMENT PATTERNS AND ITS POSSIBLE SIGNIFICANCE IN ORIENTATION BY N. A. CROLL Department of Zoology and Applied Entomology, Imperial College, London University, England An analysis of previously published and fresh data emphasises the possible significance of move- ment patterns in orientation and in sampling the environment by nematodes. A comparison is made of the asymmetry of lateral undulation in several nematodes and examples are given from P. redivivus which suggest that such asymmetries may be influenced by temperature and electrical currents. Vertical and horizontal movement patterns in P. redivivus are also related to orientation mechanisms. Although it is not now contested that the directional movements of nematodes are influenced by environmental stimuli (F. G. W. Jones, 1960; Wallace, 1961; Klingler, 1965), the mechanisms used in orientation are still a subject of contro- versy (Klingler, 1965; Green, 1966; Croll, 1967a). Evidence has been reported to support hypotheses of orientation through orthokinesis (Rode, 1962; Croll, 1966), klinokineses (F. G. W. Jones, 1960; Croll, 1965), klinotaxes (Klingler, 1963; Green, 1966) and tropotaxes (Croll, 1967a). Most of these reports suggest that sampling of the environment is achieved by comparison of stimuli during movement, and often through a comparison at http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nematologica Brill

Asymmetry in Nematode Movement Patterns and Its Possible Significance in Orientation

Nematologica , Volume 15 (3): 389 – Jan 1, 1969

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1969 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0028-2596
eISSN
1875-2926
D.O.I.
10.1163/187529269X00461
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ASYMMETRY IN NEMATODE MOVEMENT PATTERNS AND ITS POSSIBLE SIGNIFICANCE IN ORIENTATION BY N. A. CROLL Department of Zoology and Applied Entomology, Imperial College, London University, England An analysis of previously published and fresh data emphasises the possible significance of move- ment patterns in orientation and in sampling the environment by nematodes. A comparison is made of the asymmetry of lateral undulation in several nematodes and examples are given from P. redivivus which suggest that such asymmetries may be influenced by temperature and electrical currents. Vertical and horizontal movement patterns in P. redivivus are also related to orientation mechanisms. Although it is not now contested that the directional movements of nematodes are influenced by environmental stimuli (F. G. W. Jones, 1960; Wallace, 1961; Klingler, 1965), the mechanisms used in orientation are still a subject of contro- versy (Klingler, 1965; Green, 1966; Croll, 1967a). Evidence has been reported to support hypotheses of orientation through orthokinesis (Rode, 1962; Croll, 1966), klinokineses (F. G. W. Jones, 1960; Croll, 1965), klinotaxes (Klingler, 1963; Green, 1966) and tropotaxes (Croll, 1967a). Most of these reports suggest that sampling of the environment is achieved by comparison of stimuli during movement, and often through a comparison at

Journal

NematologicaBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1969

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