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Assortative Mating for Size in Asellus Aquaticus (L.) (Isopoda)

Assortative Mating for Size in Asellus Aquaticus (L.) (Isopoda) 216 ASSORTATIVE MATING FOR SIZE IN ASELLUS AQUATICUS (L.) (ISOPODA) BY ERIC VERSPOOR Faculty of Environmental Design, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada Manning (1975) presented evidence that male Asellus aquaticus (L., 1758) discriminate against smaller females when selecting mates, though for what female size relative to that of the male this was true for was not indicated. It was also not shown that such discrimination is operant in nature, or whether, as Manning contends, it actually does result in an increased reproductive fitness of the male. The following results bear on these questions. They are based on the analysis of two hundred and one mating pairs of A. aquatir.us collected in late February and early March of 1976 from a single population in Nottingham- shire. Males and females were measured to the nearest millimeter, from the tip of the head to the tip of the abdomen, and the progeny of forty-five selected pairs counted to the nearest five immediately after their release by the female. The distribution of male and female body lengths is shown in fig. 1. The mean length of the males is 11.3 mm and of the females 9.1 mm with variances of 0.68 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Crustaceana Brill

Assortative Mating for Size in Asellus Aquaticus (L.) (Isopoda)

Crustaceana , Volume 43 (2): 216 – Jan 1, 1982

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1982 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0011-216x
eISSN
1568-5403
DOI
10.1163/156854082X00579
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

216 ASSORTATIVE MATING FOR SIZE IN ASELLUS AQUATICUS (L.) (ISOPODA) BY ERIC VERSPOOR Faculty of Environmental Design, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada Manning (1975) presented evidence that male Asellus aquaticus (L., 1758) discriminate against smaller females when selecting mates, though for what female size relative to that of the male this was true for was not indicated. It was also not shown that such discrimination is operant in nature, or whether, as Manning contends, it actually does result in an increased reproductive fitness of the male. The following results bear on these questions. They are based on the analysis of two hundred and one mating pairs of A. aquatir.us collected in late February and early March of 1976 from a single population in Nottingham- shire. Males and females were measured to the nearest millimeter, from the tip of the head to the tip of the abdomen, and the progeny of forty-five selected pairs counted to the nearest five immediately after their release by the female. The distribution of male and female body lengths is shown in fig. 1. The mean length of the males is 11.3 mm and of the females 9.1 mm with variances of 0.68

Journal

CrustaceanaBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1982

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