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Association preferences of unisexual Amazon mollies (Poecilia formosa): differential response to swords based on sex of the bisexual parental species

Association preferences of unisexual Amazon mollies (Poecilia formosa): differential response to... Association preferences of unisexual Amazon mollies ( Poecilia formosa ): differential response to swords based on sex of the bisexual parental species Jennifer M. Gumm 1,2,4) & Maria Thaker 1,3,5) ( 1 Department of Biology, Texas State University-San Marcos, San Marcos, TX 78666, USA; 2 Department of Biological Sciences, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015, USA; 3 Department of Biology, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN 47809, USA) (Accepted: 6 November 2008) Summary Most females exhibit preferences for certain males and females based on mating and social decisions. Unisexual females that reproduce by gynogenesis are also expected to express as- sociation preferences, which may have been inherited from parental species, or may have evolved in response to selection pressures associated with their unisexual mating system. The unisexual, gynogenetic Amazon molly ( Poecilia formosa ) is a hybrid of the Atlantic molly ( P. mexicana ) and sailfin molly ( P. latipinna ). Although none of these three species have sword tails, the two parental species differ in preference for swords on conspecifics. We further examined the variation in pre-existing bias within this species complex by testing Amazon molly preference to associate with male and female sailfin mollies with artificially http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behaviour Brill

Association preferences of unisexual Amazon mollies (Poecilia formosa): differential response to swords based on sex of the bisexual parental species

Behaviour , Volume 146 (7): 907 – Jan 1, 2009

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2009 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0005-7959
eISSN
1568-539X
DOI
10.1163/156853908X396719
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Association preferences of unisexual Amazon mollies ( Poecilia formosa ): differential response to swords based on sex of the bisexual parental species Jennifer M. Gumm 1,2,4) & Maria Thaker 1,3,5) ( 1 Department of Biology, Texas State University-San Marcos, San Marcos, TX 78666, USA; 2 Department of Biological Sciences, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015, USA; 3 Department of Biology, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN 47809, USA) (Accepted: 6 November 2008) Summary Most females exhibit preferences for certain males and females based on mating and social decisions. Unisexual females that reproduce by gynogenesis are also expected to express as- sociation preferences, which may have been inherited from parental species, or may have evolved in response to selection pressures associated with their unisexual mating system. The unisexual, gynogenetic Amazon molly ( Poecilia formosa ) is a hybrid of the Atlantic molly ( P. mexicana ) and sailfin molly ( P. latipinna ). Although none of these three species have sword tails, the two parental species differ in preference for swords on conspecifics. We further examined the variation in pre-existing bias within this species complex by testing Amazon molly preference to associate with male and female sailfin mollies with artificially

Journal

BehaviourBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2009

Keywords: AMAZON MOLLY; PRE-EXISTING BIAS; SHOALING; MATE CHOICE; POECILIA FORMOSA

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