Arts, Censorship and the Greek Law

Arts, Censorship and the Greek Law The article discusses the Greek legal framework concerning artistic freedom and highlights the discrepancy between international human rights standards and the Greek practice as exemplified by a variety of incidents of censorship. Focusing on specific features of the Greek constitution and the national laws on obscenity and hate speech, the article examines the practice of censorship on the grounds of either blasphemy or offence to public morals and national values. At the same time it underscores the exponential rise in hate crimes, including against artists, as exemplified by the murder of young rapper Fyssas in 2014. It argues that the practice of seizure of publications, along with the lack of effective legal framework that combats hate speech, have both significantly contributed to raising self-censorship among artists and maintaining the culture of vexatious jurisdiction from which Greece suffers. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Human Rights Law Review Brill

Arts, Censorship and the Greek Law

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
2213-1027
eISSN
2213-1035
DOI
10.1163/22131035-00601006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The article discusses the Greek legal framework concerning artistic freedom and highlights the discrepancy between international human rights standards and the Greek practice as exemplified by a variety of incidents of censorship. Focusing on specific features of the Greek constitution and the national laws on obscenity and hate speech, the article examines the practice of censorship on the grounds of either blasphemy or offence to public morals and national values. At the same time it underscores the exponential rise in hate crimes, including against artists, as exemplified by the murder of young rapper Fyssas in 2014. It argues that the practice of seizure of publications, along with the lack of effective legal framework that combats hate speech, have both significantly contributed to raising self-censorship among artists and maintaining the culture of vexatious jurisdiction from which Greece suffers.

Journal

International Human Rights Law ReviewBrill

Published: May 24, 2017

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