Artificial Visible Implant Elastomer (VIE) tags of different colour and symmetry do not influence mate choice in a cichlid

Artificial Visible Implant Elastomer (VIE) tags of different colour and symmetry do not influence... Experimental individuals are frequently marked with coloured tags for individual identification. Except for birds, the consequences of such artificial tagging on mate choice have been rarely investigated even though individuals often prefer naturally brightly coloured or symmetrically ornamented mates. We tested whether differently coloured Visible Implant Elastomer (VIE) tags influence female mate choice in rainbow kribs, Pelvicachromis pulcher. Females were allowed to simultaneously choose between a control and a VIE-marked male. The VIE-marked male carried two tags of the same colour (red, blue, green or white) set symmetrically or asymmetrically. Females did not show a preference for or avoidance of males carrying any of the colours compared to control males, no matter if the tags had been set symmetrically or asymmetrically. Although we found no discrimination for or against colour-tags, we highlight the importance of considering potential influences of colour-marks on mate choice in behavioural and evolutionary studies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behaviour Brill

Artificial Visible Implant Elastomer (VIE) tags of different colour and symmetry do not influence mate choice in a cichlid

Behaviour, Volume 154 (4): 16 – Nov 23, 2016

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0005-7959
eISSN
1568-539X
D.O.I.
10.1163/1568539X-00003427
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Experimental individuals are frequently marked with coloured tags for individual identification. Except for birds, the consequences of such artificial tagging on mate choice have been rarely investigated even though individuals often prefer naturally brightly coloured or symmetrically ornamented mates. We tested whether differently coloured Visible Implant Elastomer (VIE) tags influence female mate choice in rainbow kribs, Pelvicachromis pulcher. Females were allowed to simultaneously choose between a control and a VIE-marked male. The VIE-marked male carried two tags of the same colour (red, blue, green or white) set symmetrically or asymmetrically. Females did not show a preference for or avoidance of males carrying any of the colours compared to control males, no matter if the tags had been set symmetrically or asymmetrically. Although we found no discrimination for or against colour-tags, we highlight the importance of considering potential influences of colour-marks on mate choice in behavioural and evolutionary studies.

Journal

BehaviourBrill

Published: Nov 23, 2016

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