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Art, science and religion in Romeyn de Hooghe’s Hieroglyphica

Art, science and religion in Romeyn de Hooghe’s Hieroglyphica Joke Spaans Romeyn de Hooghe (1645-1708) is best known as the prolific producer of high-quality loose-leaf prints, book illustrations and frontispieces. He left an astounding volume of etchings and engravings, in a wide variety of genres, but all bearing his distinctive style. Near the end of his life, however, he also wrote two substantial books that so far have hardly attracted scholarly attention. The first one, his Spiegel van Staat des Vereenigde Nederlands, has recently been noted for its contribution to the history of republicanism.1 His Hieroglyphica of merkbeelden der oude volkeren, namentlyk Egyptenaren, Chaldeeuwen, Feniciers, Joden, Grieken, Romeynen, enz. Nevens een omstandig Bericht van het Verval en voortkruypende Verbastering der Godsdiensten door verscheyde eeuwen; en eyndelyk de Hervorming, tot op deze tyden toe vervolgt,2 published posthumously, reflects De Hooghe's mature views on religion. Among its more than 400 pages of text, De Hooghe placed 63 full-page etchings. Rather than being simply illustrations accompanying the text of his book, the etchings present his argument, whereas the text `illustrates' ­ in its literal meaning, `sheds light on' ­ the plates. Each plate and chapter is dedicated to a specific theme in the genealogy of the Christian religion. As the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Netherlands Yearbook for History of Art / Nederlands Kunsthistorisch Jaarboek Online Brill

Art, science and religion in Romeyn de Hooghe’s Hieroglyphica

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright 2011 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0169-6726
eISSN
2214-5966
DOI
10.1163/22145966-90000775
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Joke Spaans Romeyn de Hooghe (1645-1708) is best known as the prolific producer of high-quality loose-leaf prints, book illustrations and frontispieces. He left an astounding volume of etchings and engravings, in a wide variety of genres, but all bearing his distinctive style. Near the end of his life, however, he also wrote two substantial books that so far have hardly attracted scholarly attention. The first one, his Spiegel van Staat des Vereenigde Nederlands, has recently been noted for its contribution to the history of republicanism.1 His Hieroglyphica of merkbeelden der oude volkeren, namentlyk Egyptenaren, Chaldeeuwen, Feniciers, Joden, Grieken, Romeynen, enz. Nevens een omstandig Bericht van het Verval en voortkruypende Verbastering der Godsdiensten door verscheyde eeuwen; en eyndelyk de Hervorming, tot op deze tyden toe vervolgt,2 published posthumously, reflects De Hooghe's mature views on religion. Among its more than 400 pages of text, De Hooghe placed 63 full-page etchings. Rather than being simply illustrations accompanying the text of his book, the etchings present his argument, whereas the text `illustrates' ­ in its literal meaning, `sheds light on' ­ the plates. Each plate and chapter is dedicated to a specific theme in the genealogy of the Christian religion. As the

Journal

Netherlands Yearbook for History of Art / Nederlands Kunsthistorisch Jaarboek OnlineBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2011

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