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Art and the Orientation of Thought

Art and the Orientation of Thought 171 Art and the Orientation of Thought DOROTHEA OLKOWSKI University of San Diego For thoughtful human beings, beginnings must be simultaneous with anxiety, fear, feelings of loss, uncertainty and doubt; as such, they are the site of and opportunity for self-deception. The artist is faced with material, the writer with opaque combinations of black marks, the composer with undifferentiated sound, the scientist with world-wide illness or physio-chemical chaos, the social worker with depersonalized misery. Each individual task also carries with it a responsibility that encompasses the entire history of Western culture and society. There are cathedrals, palaces and monuments; there are uncountable rooms filled with paintings, sculptures, environments, happenings, documentation. There are unknown rows of dark shelves, libraries of Babel, which in spite of the seemingly "formless and chaotic nature of nearly all the books,"' clamor for individuality and immortality. There is also mystery and the physical resonance of the so-called primitive music of third-world peoples, the notion of "progress," the promise of democracy to cultures deliberately exploited or murdered. Each time we begin, we bring all this along with us. Seeking our orientation, in the midst of history and culture, we find ourselves immersed in a chaos http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

Art and the Orientation of Thought

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 16 (1): 171 – Jan 1, 1986

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1986 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916486X00112
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

171 Art and the Orientation of Thought DOROTHEA OLKOWSKI University of San Diego For thoughtful human beings, beginnings must be simultaneous with anxiety, fear, feelings of loss, uncertainty and doubt; as such, they are the site of and opportunity for self-deception. The artist is faced with material, the writer with opaque combinations of black marks, the composer with undifferentiated sound, the scientist with world-wide illness or physio-chemical chaos, the social worker with depersonalized misery. Each individual task also carries with it a responsibility that encompasses the entire history of Western culture and society. There are cathedrals, palaces and monuments; there are uncountable rooms filled with paintings, sculptures, environments, happenings, documentation. There are unknown rows of dark shelves, libraries of Babel, which in spite of the seemingly "formless and chaotic nature of nearly all the books,"' clamor for individuality and immortality. There is also mystery and the physical resonance of the so-called primitive music of third-world peoples, the notion of "progress," the promise of democracy to cultures deliberately exploited or murdered. Each time we begin, we bring all this along with us. Seeking our orientation, in the midst of history and culture, we find ourselves immersed in a chaos

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1986

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