Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Arendt and Hobbes: Glory, Sacrificial Violence, and the Political Imagination

Arendt and Hobbes: Glory, Sacrificial Violence, and the Political Imagination © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2011 DOI: 10.1163/156916411X558864 Research in Phenomenology 41 (2011) 1–22 brill.nl/rp R e s e a r c h i n P h e n o m e n o l o g y Arendt and Hobbes: Glory, Sacrificial Violence, and the Political Imagination Peg Birmingham DePaul University Abstract The dominant narrative today of modern political power, inspired by Foucault, is one that traces the move from the spectacle of the scaffold to the disciplining of bodies whereby the modern political subject, animated by a fundamental fear and the will to live, is promised secu- rity in exchange for obedience and productivity. In this essay, I call into question this narrative, arguing that that the modern political imagination, rooted in Hobbes, is animated not by fear but instead by the desire for glory and immortality, a desire that is spectacularly displayed in the violence of the modern battlefield. I go on to argue that Hannah Arendt, writing in the ruins of the Second World War, rethinks the modern legacy of political glory. I claim that Arendt’s reflections on violence and glory, which she rethinks from her earliest writings on violence in the 1940s to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

Arendt and Hobbes: Glory, Sacrificial Violence, and the Political Imagination

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 41 (1): 1 – Jan 1, 2011

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/arendt-and-hobbes-glory-sacrificial-violence-and-the-political-uFmrehN0Y9
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2011 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916411X558864
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2011 DOI: 10.1163/156916411X558864 Research in Phenomenology 41 (2011) 1–22 brill.nl/rp R e s e a r c h i n P h e n o m e n o l o g y Arendt and Hobbes: Glory, Sacrificial Violence, and the Political Imagination Peg Birmingham DePaul University Abstract The dominant narrative today of modern political power, inspired by Foucault, is one that traces the move from the spectacle of the scaffold to the disciplining of bodies whereby the modern political subject, animated by a fundamental fear and the will to live, is promised secu- rity in exchange for obedience and productivity. In this essay, I call into question this narrative, arguing that that the modern political imagination, rooted in Hobbes, is animated not by fear but instead by the desire for glory and immortality, a desire that is spectacularly displayed in the violence of the modern battlefield. I go on to argue that Hannah Arendt, writing in the ruins of the Second World War, rethinks the modern legacy of political glory. I claim that Arendt’s reflections on violence and glory, which she rethinks from her earliest writings on violence in the 1940s to

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2011

Keywords: power; violence; political imagination; glory; fear

There are no references for this article.