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Appendix: List of International Norms

Appendix: List of International Norms In the following I offer several comments on a recent discussion by Sander Griffioen and Richard Mouw on modern pluralism. Pluralisms and Horizons (Mouw & Griffioen, 1993) is a deceptively small book of wide compass, which for three reasons makes interesting reading. First, the authors have much to say on one of the current hot-items in Western civilization: pluralism. Second, they take their point of departure in Christian philosophy, and more specifically in the Reformed tradition. And third, they unite a principled stance based on Christian faith with an openminded readiness to seriously take issue with many different points of view. Their book is in my opinion worth reading merely as an exemplary exercise in intellectual tolerance. The following offers, then, for what it is worth, a short and limited critique of some aspects of Pluralisms and Horizons. Since I am especially interested in the history of Christian thought, and since Philosophia Reformata is historically and philosophically rooted in the Reformed tradition, my criticism will particularly centre on Calvinist (or, if you will, Calvinian) thought. I have two specific objections to the views put forward by Mouw and Griffioen. Both are connected with the idea of “directional pluralism” upon which the authors elaborate; both centre on my contention that the authors fail to appreciate the nature of modern (Dutch) culture. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Yearbook of Minority Issues Online Brill

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright 2008 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1570-7865
eISSN
2211-6117
DOI
10.1163/22116117-90000087
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In the following I offer several comments on a recent discussion by Sander Griffioen and Richard Mouw on modern pluralism. Pluralisms and Horizons (Mouw & Griffioen, 1993) is a deceptively small book of wide compass, which for three reasons makes interesting reading. First, the authors have much to say on one of the current hot-items in Western civilization: pluralism. Second, they take their point of departure in Christian philosophy, and more specifically in the Reformed tradition. And third, they unite a principled stance based on Christian faith with an openminded readiness to seriously take issue with many different points of view. Their book is in my opinion worth reading merely as an exemplary exercise in intellectual tolerance. The following offers, then, for what it is worth, a short and limited critique of some aspects of Pluralisms and Horizons. Since I am especially interested in the history of Christian thought, and since Philosophia Reformata is historically and philosophically rooted in the Reformed tradition, my criticism will particularly centre on Calvinist (or, if you will, Calvinian) thought. I have two specific objections to the views put forward by Mouw and Griffioen. Both are connected with the idea of “directional pluralism” upon which the authors elaborate; both centre on my contention that the authors fail to appreciate the nature of modern (Dutch) culture.

Journal

European Yearbook of Minority Issues OnlineBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2006

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