Antipredator response to injury-released chemical alarm cues by convict cichlid young before and after independence from parental protection

Antipredator response to injury-released chemical alarm cues by convict cichlid young before and... ANTIPREDATOR RESPONSE TO INJURY-RELEASED CHEMICAL ALARM CUES BY CONVICT CICHLID YOUNG BEFORE AND AFTER INDEPENDENCE FROM PARENTAL PROTECTION by SHIREEN D. ALEMADI and BRIAN D. WISENDEN 1,2) (Biology Department, Minnesota State University Moorhead, 1104 7 th St. S., Moorhead, MN, 56563, USA) (Acc. 1-II-2002) Summary Injury-released chemical alarm cues are released when predators attack aquatic prey. These cues are generally released only in this context and as such, conspeciŽ c alarm cues form an important component of risk assessment. Minnows (Ostariophysi, Cyprinidae) possess a well-developed chemical alarm system. However, minnows do not respond to conspeciŽ c injury-released alarm cues until 30 to 50 d post-hatch. Non-ostariophysan Ž shes respond to chemical alarm cues with antipredator behavior but the ontogeny of this behavior is not known for any species. Here, we test convict cichlids (Acanthopterygii: Cichlidae), a species known to respond to alarm cues as adults. Convict cichlid parents care for their eggs and defend their developing young from predators for 4 to 6 weeks. In our experiment, we tested the ontogeny of antipredator response to chemical alarm cues in young convict cichlids well within and just beyond the size range typically defended by parents. We found that small http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behaviour Brill

Antipredator response to injury-released chemical alarm cues by convict cichlid young before and after independence from parental protection

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2002 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0005-7959
eISSN
1568-539X
D.O.I.
10.1163/15685390260136726
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ANTIPREDATOR RESPONSE TO INJURY-RELEASED CHEMICAL ALARM CUES BY CONVICT CICHLID YOUNG BEFORE AND AFTER INDEPENDENCE FROM PARENTAL PROTECTION by SHIREEN D. ALEMADI and BRIAN D. WISENDEN 1,2) (Biology Department, Minnesota State University Moorhead, 1104 7 th St. S., Moorhead, MN, 56563, USA) (Acc. 1-II-2002) Summary Injury-released chemical alarm cues are released when predators attack aquatic prey. These cues are generally released only in this context and as such, conspeciŽ c alarm cues form an important component of risk assessment. Minnows (Ostariophysi, Cyprinidae) possess a well-developed chemical alarm system. However, minnows do not respond to conspeciŽ c injury-released alarm cues until 30 to 50 d post-hatch. Non-ostariophysan Ž shes respond to chemical alarm cues with antipredator behavior but the ontogeny of this behavior is not known for any species. Here, we test convict cichlids (Acanthopterygii: Cichlidae), a species known to respond to alarm cues as adults. Convict cichlid parents care for their eggs and defend their developing young from predators for 4 to 6 weeks. In our experiment, we tested the ontogeny of antipredator response to chemical alarm cues in young convict cichlids well within and just beyond the size range typically defended by parents. We found that small

Journal

BehaviourBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2002

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