ANIMAL RIGHTS AND THEORIES OF ORIGINS: A PLEA FOR UNITY

ANIMAL RIGHTS AND THEORIES OF ORIGINS: A PLEA FOR UNITY ANIMAL RIGHTS AND THEORIES OF ORIGINS: A PLEA FOR UNITY Michael C. Morris and Richard H. Thornhill Abstract A useful philosophical case against vivisection in uential with the general public rests on the following three premises: (1) animals have interests as conscious beings; (2) it is unethical to cause pain and su V ering to conscious beings for trivial reasons; and (3) animal models cannot be extrapolated to human beings, so vivisection is a trivial reason. Darwinian arguments have been used to back up each of the three premises above, and, furthermore it has been asserted by animal liberationists that those who do not hold to the evolutionary paradigm are more likely to support vivisection. Here, we present arguments that show why a belief in Darwinism (or in evolution generally) neither strengthens nor weakens the three anti-vivisectionist premises above. We also argue that there is no evidence to suggest that Darwinists are any less (or more) likely to support vivisection than those who hold views on biological origin that are further from the scientiŽ c mainstream. By leaving out arguments on origins, we hope that Darwinists, non-Darwinist evolutionists and creationists of all types can work together to make http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Worldviews Brill

ANIMAL RIGHTS AND THEORIES OF ORIGINS: A PLEA FOR UNITY

Worldviews, Volume 7 (3): 330 – Jan 1, 2003

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2003 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1363-5247
eISSN
1568-5357
D.O.I.
10.1163/156853503322709164
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ANIMAL RIGHTS AND THEORIES OF ORIGINS: A PLEA FOR UNITY Michael C. Morris and Richard H. Thornhill Abstract A useful philosophical case against vivisection in uential with the general public rests on the following three premises: (1) animals have interests as conscious beings; (2) it is unethical to cause pain and su V ering to conscious beings for trivial reasons; and (3) animal models cannot be extrapolated to human beings, so vivisection is a trivial reason. Darwinian arguments have been used to back up each of the three premises above, and, furthermore it has been asserted by animal liberationists that those who do not hold to the evolutionary paradigm are more likely to support vivisection. Here, we present arguments that show why a belief in Darwinism (or in evolution generally) neither strengthens nor weakens the three anti-vivisectionist premises above. We also argue that there is no evidence to suggest that Darwinists are any less (or more) likely to support vivisection than those who hold views on biological origin that are further from the scientiŽ c mainstream. By leaving out arguments on origins, we hope that Darwinists, non-Darwinist evolutionists and creationists of all types can work together to make

Journal

WorldviewsBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2003

Keywords: vivisection; animal rights; creation.; evolution

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