An implicit measure of undetected change

An implicit measure of undetected change Spatial Vision , Vol. 14, No. 1, pp. 21– 44 (2000) Ó VSP 2000. An implicit measure of undetected change IAN M. THORNTON 1 ; ¤ and DIEGO FERNANDEZ-DUQUE 2 ; ¤ 1 Cambridge Basic Research, Nissan Technical Center North America, Inc., Cambridge, MA, USA 2 Psychology Department, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR, USA Received 3 September 1999; revised 1 February 2000; accepted 12 May 2000 Abstract —Several paradigms (e.g. change blindness, inattentional blindness, transsaccadic integra- tion) indicate that observers are often very poor at reporting changes to their visual environment. Such evidence has been used to suggest that the spatio-temporal coherence needed to represent change can only occur in the presence of focused attention. However, those studies almost always rely on explicit reports. It remains a possibility that the visual system can implicitly detect change, but that in the absence of focused attention, the change does not reach awareness and consequently is not reported. To test this possibility, we used a simple change detection paradigm coupled with a speeded orien- tation discrimination task. Even when observers reported being unaware of a change in an item’s orientation, its Ž nal orientation effectively biased their response in the orientation http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Spatial Vision (continued as Seeing & Perceiving from 2010) Brill

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2001 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0169-1015
eISSN
1568-5683
D.O.I.
10.1163/156856801741341
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Spatial Vision , Vol. 14, No. 1, pp. 21– 44 (2000) Ó VSP 2000. An implicit measure of undetected change IAN M. THORNTON 1 ; ¤ and DIEGO FERNANDEZ-DUQUE 2 ; ¤ 1 Cambridge Basic Research, Nissan Technical Center North America, Inc., Cambridge, MA, USA 2 Psychology Department, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR, USA Received 3 September 1999; revised 1 February 2000; accepted 12 May 2000 Abstract —Several paradigms (e.g. change blindness, inattentional blindness, transsaccadic integra- tion) indicate that observers are often very poor at reporting changes to their visual environment. Such evidence has been used to suggest that the spatio-temporal coherence needed to represent change can only occur in the presence of focused attention. However, those studies almost always rely on explicit reports. It remains a possibility that the visual system can implicitly detect change, but that in the absence of focused attention, the change does not reach awareness and consequently is not reported. To test this possibility, we used a simple change detection paradigm coupled with a speeded orien- tation discrimination task. Even when observers reported being unaware of a change in an item’s orientation, its Ž nal orientation effectively biased their response in the orientation

Journal

Spatial Vision (continued as Seeing & Perceiving from 2010)Brill

Published: Jan 1, 2001

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