An "identity crisis" in the international law of human rights? The challenge of reproductive cloning

An "identity crisis" in the international law of human rights? The challenge of reproductive cloning An “identity crisis” in the international law of human rights? The challenge of reproductive cloning SONIA HARRIS-SHORT* Lecturer in Law, Universiy of Durham Introduction The potential to utilize Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer (“SCNT”) – more pop- ularly known as human cloning – in the treatment of patients suffering from serious debilitating diseases, such as Parkinsons, 1 has led some States, includ- ing the UK, to permit further research into the development and potential ther- apeutic application of this controversial technique. 2 The very high risks associated with the use of SCNT currently render human cloning for repro- ductive purposes unthinkable. 3 However, the more skilled and efŽ cient scien- tists become in the use of cloning technology for therapeutic purposes, the greater the likelihood that reproductive cloning will become a technical pos- sibility. Indeed in April 2002, the controversial Italian scientist, Dr Severino Antinori, was reported as saying that one of his patients was pregnant with a cloned embryo. 4 This was followed in December 2002 with claims by the com- pany Clonaid that the Ž rst cloned child had been born to US parents. 5 In con- trast to therapeutic cloning, the possibility of creating cloned human http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The International Journal of Children's Rights Brill

An "identity crisis" in the international law of human rights? The challenge of reproductive cloning

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2004 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0927-5568
eISSN
1571-8182
D.O.I.
10.1163/157181804322985169
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

An “identity crisis” in the international law of human rights? The challenge of reproductive cloning SONIA HARRIS-SHORT* Lecturer in Law, Universiy of Durham Introduction The potential to utilize Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer (“SCNT”) – more pop- ularly known as human cloning – in the treatment of patients suffering from serious debilitating diseases, such as Parkinsons, 1 has led some States, includ- ing the UK, to permit further research into the development and potential ther- apeutic application of this controversial technique. 2 The very high risks associated with the use of SCNT currently render human cloning for repro- ductive purposes unthinkable. 3 However, the more skilled and efŽ cient scien- tists become in the use of cloning technology for therapeutic purposes, the greater the likelihood that reproductive cloning will become a technical pos- sibility. Indeed in April 2002, the controversial Italian scientist, Dr Severino Antinori, was reported as saying that one of his patients was pregnant with a cloned embryo. 4 This was followed in December 2002 with claims by the com- pany Clonaid that the Ž rst cloned child had been born to US parents. 5 In con- trast to therapeutic cloning, the possibility of creating cloned human

Journal

The International Journal of Children's RightsBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2004

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