An Experiment On Spacing-Out as a Defence Against Predation

An Experiment On Spacing-Out as a Defence Against Predation AN EXPERIMENT ON SPACING-OUT AS A DEFENCE AGAINST PREDATION by N. TINBERGEN, M. IMPEKOVEN and D. FRANCK 1) 2) (Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, England) (With 3 Figures) (Rec. 10-VII-1966) This study is based on the hypothesis that certain predators exert a pressure on individuals even of well-camouflaged prey species to live well spaced-out; more precisely, to live at interindividual distances which greatly exceed the distance from which predators usually detect them directly. This hypothesis occurred to the senior author in the course of studies, partly by himself, partly by his co-workers (DE RUITER, 1952, I(?55; TINBERGEN, Ig53, 1956, 1957, 1965; TINBERGEN Et al., 1962; PATTERSON, 1965), and in connection with certain data in the literature. The evidence leading to the hypothesis is of various types; each kind of evidence is in itself admittedly incomplete or even tentative, but in their totality the data were considered suggestive enough to warrant the present study. It is of course well realised that camouflage, in the sense of colour patterns hampering the detection of a prey by predators that hunt by sight, is fully effective only if accompanied by certain specific types of behaviour. Those generally recognised, and experimentally checked http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behaviour Brill

An Experiment On Spacing-Out as a Defence Against Predation

Behaviour, Volume 28 (3-4): 307 – Jan 1, 1967

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1967 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0005-7959
eISSN
1568-539X
DOI
10.1163/156853967X00064
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AN EXPERIMENT ON SPACING-OUT AS A DEFENCE AGAINST PREDATION by N. TINBERGEN, M. IMPEKOVEN and D. FRANCK 1) 2) (Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, England) (With 3 Figures) (Rec. 10-VII-1966) This study is based on the hypothesis that certain predators exert a pressure on individuals even of well-camouflaged prey species to live well spaced-out; more precisely, to live at interindividual distances which greatly exceed the distance from which predators usually detect them directly. This hypothesis occurred to the senior author in the course of studies, partly by himself, partly by his co-workers (DE RUITER, 1952, I(?55; TINBERGEN, Ig53, 1956, 1957, 1965; TINBERGEN Et al., 1962; PATTERSON, 1965), and in connection with certain data in the literature. The evidence leading to the hypothesis is of various types; each kind of evidence is in itself admittedly incomplete or even tentative, but in their totality the data were considered suggestive enough to warrant the present study. It is of course well realised that camouflage, in the sense of colour patterns hampering the detection of a prey by predators that hunt by sight, is fully effective only if accompanied by certain specific types of behaviour. Those generally recognised, and experimentally checked

Journal

BehaviourBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1967

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