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An Economy of Exteriority

An Economy of Exteriority 283 trace that way here-Sallis' tracing of that way (191-210) is already so highly condensed and allusory that any attempt at retracing that trac- ing would go far beyond the bounds of this review. The following must here su?ce: According to Plato and Aristotle, wonder is the beginning of philosophy (192), so any return to that which makes philosophy possible must be an archaic thinking, such as Sallis' thought. But be- fore, or in the course of, such a return to wonder, one must first con- sider the attempt of philosophy to put an end to that beginning, an attempt prepared by Aristotle and carried through by Hegel to make philosophy into knowledge or a science of wisdom (193-97). But in a discussion mainly of the Theaetetus and the Republic, Sallis returns to that which provokes philosophy: wonder at the mixing up of oppo- sites, e.g., the intelligible and the sensible, and the attempt to think them together (197-204). But, of course, it is precisely opposites as doublings in a myriad of forms that has provoked, driven, and sus- tained Double Truth throughout. There is no escaping the play of op- posites if philosophy returns to its beginning http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

An Economy of Exteriority

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 26 (1): 283 – Jan 1, 1996

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1996 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916496X00148
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

283 trace that way here-Sallis' tracing of that way (191-210) is already so highly condensed and allusory that any attempt at retracing that trac- ing would go far beyond the bounds of this review. The following must here su?ce: According to Plato and Aristotle, wonder is the beginning of philosophy (192), so any return to that which makes philosophy possible must be an archaic thinking, such as Sallis' thought. But be- fore, or in the course of, such a return to wonder, one must first con- sider the attempt of philosophy to put an end to that beginning, an attempt prepared by Aristotle and carried through by Hegel to make philosophy into knowledge or a science of wisdom (193-97). But in a discussion mainly of the Theaetetus and the Republic, Sallis returns to that which provokes philosophy: wonder at the mixing up of oppo- sites, e.g., the intelligible and the sensible, and the attempt to think them together (197-204). But, of course, it is precisely opposites as doublings in a myriad of forms that has provoked, driven, and sus- tained Double Truth throughout. There is no escaping the play of op- posites if philosophy returns to its beginning

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1996

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