Amplitude spectra of Corncrake calls: what do they signalise?

Amplitude spectra of Corncrake calls: what do they signalise? Animal Biology , Vol. 54, No. 2, pp. 207-220 (2004)  Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2004. Also available online - www.brill.nl Amplitude spectra of Corncrake calls: what do they signalise? TOMASZ S. OSIEJUK 1 , ∗ , BOGUMIŁA OLECH 2 1 Department of Animal Morphology, Institute of Environmental Biology, Adam Mickiewicz University, 28 Czerwca 1956/198, 61-485 Pozna ´ n, Poland 2 Kampinoski National Park, Tetmajera 38, 05-080 Izabelin, Poland Abstract —The territorial call of corncrake Crex crex males is a disyllabic, loud, pulse repetition signal repeated in long series at night. It seems to be relatively simple as it lacks the repertoire variation typical of passerines, but still seems to be the equivalent of a territorial and/or advertisement song. In this paper we tested: (1) whether the pattern of energy distribution within the call (i.e. amplitude spectrum) is individually invariant; (2) whether it could be a signal used in an individual recognition system; and (3) whether it is a sexually selected honest trait related to male body size. We found that amplitude spectra varied more between than within males, but it is rather unlikely that energy distribution is a single feature encoding identity of a male. We found http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Animal Biology Brill

Amplitude spectra of Corncrake calls: what do they signalise?

Animal Biology, Volume 54 (2): 207 – Jan 1, 2004

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2004 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1570-7555
eISSN
1570-7563
DOI
10.1163/1570756041445218
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Animal Biology , Vol. 54, No. 2, pp. 207-220 (2004)  Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2004. Also available online - www.brill.nl Amplitude spectra of Corncrake calls: what do they signalise? TOMASZ S. OSIEJUK 1 , ∗ , BOGUMIŁA OLECH 2 1 Department of Animal Morphology, Institute of Environmental Biology, Adam Mickiewicz University, 28 Czerwca 1956/198, 61-485 Pozna ´ n, Poland 2 Kampinoski National Park, Tetmajera 38, 05-080 Izabelin, Poland Abstract —The territorial call of corncrake Crex crex males is a disyllabic, loud, pulse repetition signal repeated in long series at night. It seems to be relatively simple as it lacks the repertoire variation typical of passerines, but still seems to be the equivalent of a territorial and/or advertisement song. In this paper we tested: (1) whether the pattern of energy distribution within the call (i.e. amplitude spectrum) is individually invariant; (2) whether it could be a signal used in an individual recognition system; and (3) whether it is a sexually selected honest trait related to male body size. We found that amplitude spectra varied more between than within males, but it is rather unlikely that energy distribution is a single feature encoding identity of a male. We found

Journal

Animal BiologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2004

Keywords: BODY SIZE; RECOGNITION; CREX CREX; CORNCRAKE; INDIVIDUAL; AMPLITUDE SPECTRUM; ENERGY DISTRIBUTION

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