Ammatoan Indigenous Religion and Forest Conservation

Ammatoan Indigenous Religion and Forest Conservation This article is concerned with the indigenous religious-based forest conservation of the Ammatoans of Sulawesi in the eastern part of Indonesia. It explores the Ammatoans’ religious ideas of social actors that extend beyond human beings. Ammatoans understand that the cosmos is inhabited by not only human but also other non-human beings such as the land, forest, plants, animals, and so forth. Non-human beings do not only live together but also share the life with human beings in this world. Both human and non-human beings are equally perceived to be persons/subjects constitutive of intersubjective relationships. Such religious perception of intersubjective relations governs Ammatoans’ everyday behaviors and practices, including those of forest conservation. Ammatoans’ forest conservation practices include sets of regulations and punishments that are strictly enforced. Ammatoans’ religious ideas and practices of forest conservation illustrate what scholars have called “religious ecology.” http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Worldviews Brill

Ammatoan Indigenous Religion and Forest Conservation

Worldviews, Volume 19 (2): 144 – Jan 1, 2015

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright 2015 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands.
ISSN
1363-5247
eISSN
1568-5357
DOI
10.1163/15685357-01902005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is concerned with the indigenous religious-based forest conservation of the Ammatoans of Sulawesi in the eastern part of Indonesia. It explores the Ammatoans’ religious ideas of social actors that extend beyond human beings. Ammatoans understand that the cosmos is inhabited by not only human but also other non-human beings such as the land, forest, plants, animals, and so forth. Non-human beings do not only live together but also share the life with human beings in this world. Both human and non-human beings are equally perceived to be persons/subjects constitutive of intersubjective relationships. Such religious perception of intersubjective relations governs Ammatoans’ everyday behaviors and practices, including those of forest conservation. Ammatoans’ forest conservation practices include sets of regulations and punishments that are strictly enforced. Ammatoans’ religious ideas and practices of forest conservation illustrate what scholars have called “religious ecology.”

Journal

WorldviewsBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2015

Keywords: indigenous religion; Ammatoan; Indonesia; intersubjective; forest conservation

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