Amal Dunqul, The Prince of Protest Poets

Amal Dunqul, The Prince of Protest Poets Once called the prince of protest poets, Amal Dunqul (1940-1983) was indeed an Egyptian poet in permanent opposition to the figures of established authority, be it political, literary or religious. His poems were therefore often banned from mainstream publications, and deprived of timely critical and scholarly recognition. Although his poetry received critical recognition and attention posthumously, much remains to be done. Dunqul’s poems were original and unique contributions to modern Arabic poetry, especially with regards to his use of historical texts. This article is a study of three of Dunqul’s hallmark poems, written in 1961, 1967 and 1972 at three different stages of his short literary career. The article focuses on poetry’s intertextual engagement with history, and the political significance of this engagement. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Arabic Literature Brill

Amal Dunqul, The Prince of Protest Poets

Journal of Arabic Literature, Volume 45 (2-3): 218 – Dec 1, 2014

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-2376
eISSN
1570-064X
DOI
10.1163/1570064x-12341285
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Once called the prince of protest poets, Amal Dunqul (1940-1983) was indeed an Egyptian poet in permanent opposition to the figures of established authority, be it political, literary or religious. His poems were therefore often banned from mainstream publications, and deprived of timely critical and scholarly recognition. Although his poetry received critical recognition and attention posthumously, much remains to be done. Dunqul’s poems were original and unique contributions to modern Arabic poetry, especially with regards to his use of historical texts. This article is a study of three of Dunqul’s hallmark poems, written in 1961, 1967 and 1972 at three different stages of his short literary career. The article focuses on poetry’s intertextual engagement with history, and the political significance of this engagement.

Journal

Journal of Arabic LiteratureBrill

Published: Dec 1, 2014

Keywords: Dunqul; poetry; folklore; Abdel Nasser; Sadat

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