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Age Differences in Foraging Behavior of the American Robin (Turdus Migratorius)

Age Differences in Foraging Behavior of the American Robin (Turdus Migratorius) AGE DIFFERENCES IN FORAGING BEHAVIOR OF THE AMERICAN ROBIN (TURDUS MIGRATORIUS) by MICHAEL GOCHFELD and JOANNA BURGER') (Department of Environmental & Community Medicine, U.M.D.N.J. - Rutgers Medical School, Piscataway, N.J. 08854, U.S.A., and Department of Biological Sciences, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, N.J., 08903, U.S.A.) (Acc. 12-IX-1983) Most physiologic and behavioral characteristics of birds undergo matura- tion. After juvenile birds become independent of their parents, they must still perfect their foraging skills to the point where they can obtain not only enough food to sustain themselves but to successfully raise young. The first reports of age differences in the feeding ability of birds were those of ORIANS (1969) and RECHER & RECHER (1969) who found that young brown pelicans (Pelecanus occidentalis) and little blue herons (Florida caerulea) were less unsuccessful at capturing food than were adults. RECHER & RECHER (1969) concluded that the need to perfect immature feeding skills was an important factor favoring delayed reproductive maturity (see BURGER, 1980; RYDER, 1980). Although passerine birds (Order Passeriformes) comprise about half the world's avian species, little is known of age differences in foraging skills. Recently fledged young eastern bluebirds (Sialia sialis) were less skillful at capturing prey than were adults http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behaviour Brill

Age Differences in Foraging Behavior of the American Robin (Turdus Migratorius)

Behaviour , Volume 88 (3-4): 227 – Jan 1, 1984

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1984 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0005-7959
eISSN
1568-539X
DOI
10.1163/156853984X00335
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AGE DIFFERENCES IN FORAGING BEHAVIOR OF THE AMERICAN ROBIN (TURDUS MIGRATORIUS) by MICHAEL GOCHFELD and JOANNA BURGER') (Department of Environmental & Community Medicine, U.M.D.N.J. - Rutgers Medical School, Piscataway, N.J. 08854, U.S.A., and Department of Biological Sciences, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, N.J., 08903, U.S.A.) (Acc. 12-IX-1983) Most physiologic and behavioral characteristics of birds undergo matura- tion. After juvenile birds become independent of their parents, they must still perfect their foraging skills to the point where they can obtain not only enough food to sustain themselves but to successfully raise young. The first reports of age differences in the feeding ability of birds were those of ORIANS (1969) and RECHER & RECHER (1969) who found that young brown pelicans (Pelecanus occidentalis) and little blue herons (Florida caerulea) were less unsuccessful at capturing food than were adults. RECHER & RECHER (1969) concluded that the need to perfect immature feeding skills was an important factor favoring delayed reproductive maturity (see BURGER, 1980; RYDER, 1980). Although passerine birds (Order Passeriformes) comprise about half the world's avian species, little is known of age differences in foraging skills. Recently fledged young eastern bluebirds (Sialia sialis) were less skillful at capturing prey than were adults

Journal

BehaviourBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1984

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