After the Revolution: Sovereign Respect and the Rule of Law in Egypt

After the Revolution: Sovereign Respect and the Rule of Law in Egypt Yearbook of Islamic and Middle Eastern Law 16 (2010­2011): 17­32 YIME Ellis Goldberg* and Hind Ahmed Zaki** 1INTRODUCTION During the first six months of 2011 many of the institutions of the Egyptian republic collapsed under the pressure of massive street demonstrations and along with them the authority of the state disappeared. In many areas there was a widespread sense that, along with the institutions of the state, public order had collapsed. As of this writing there remain acute fears in the country that, without the police power of the state, public order remains threatened. As Egyptians struggle with the process of creating a second republic, stark challenges confront the legal system in the coming year as institutions and authority are reconstituted. A paradox is that the judicial system appears to be the branch of Egyptian government the public least wants to experience significant institutional change even as profound questions about the rule of law, the role of the courts, and the nature of government authority emerge. In this article we argue that two distinct concepts of government and its relationship to law now are in play in contemporary Egypt--the rule of law and state authority or sovereignty. We http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Yearbook of Islamic and Middle Eastern Law Online Brill

After the Revolution: Sovereign Respect and the Rule of Law in Egypt

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright 2010 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1384-2935
eISSN
2211-2987
DOI
10.1163/22112987-91000236
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Yearbook of Islamic and Middle Eastern Law 16 (2010­2011): 17­32 YIME Ellis Goldberg* and Hind Ahmed Zaki** 1INTRODUCTION During the first six months of 2011 many of the institutions of the Egyptian republic collapsed under the pressure of massive street demonstrations and along with them the authority of the state disappeared. In many areas there was a widespread sense that, along with the institutions of the state, public order had collapsed. As of this writing there remain acute fears in the country that, without the police power of the state, public order remains threatened. As Egyptians struggle with the process of creating a second republic, stark challenges confront the legal system in the coming year as institutions and authority are reconstituted. A paradox is that the judicial system appears to be the branch of Egyptian government the public least wants to experience significant institutional change even as profound questions about the rule of law, the role of the courts, and the nature of government authority emerge. In this article we argue that two distinct concepts of government and its relationship to law now are in play in contemporary Egypt--the rule of law and state authority or sovereignty. We

Journal

Yearbook of Islamic and Middle Eastern Law OnlineBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2010

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