Acquisition of foraging competence in wild brown capuchins (Cebus apella), with special reference to conspecifics' foraging artefacts as an indirect social influence

Acquisition of foraging competence in wild brown capuchins (Cebus apella), with special reference... Acquisition of foraging competence in wild brown capuchins ( Cebus apella ), with special reference to conspecifics’ foraging artefacts as an indirect social influence Noëlle Gunst 1,4) , Sue Boinski 2) & Dorothy M. Fragaszy 3) ( 1 Institute of Ecology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA; 2 Department of Anthropology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; 3 Department of Psychology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA) (Accepted: 22 October 2007) Summary Wild brown capuchins ( Cebus apella ) in Raleighvallen, Suriname forage on larvae hidden in- side bamboo stalks via searching and extractive behaviours. We found that developing profi- ciency at obtaining larvae from bamboo stalks extends through several years of juvenescence. Older juveniles pass through a transition from a juvenile pattern to an adult pattern of forag- ing efficiency and diet selection. Whereas most studies have investigated the contribution of direct interactions between a naïve individual and a competent forager on the acquisition of foraging expertise, we focused on indirect social influence through foraging artefacts left in the habitat by conspecifics. Young individuals foraged at bamboo stalks more often shortly after than shortly before encountering bamboo segments previously opened by foragers to extract larvae. We discuss http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behaviour Brill

Acquisition of foraging competence in wild brown capuchins (Cebus apella), with special reference to conspecifics' foraging artefacts as an indirect social influence

Behaviour, Volume 145 (2): 195 – Jan 1, 2008

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2008 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0005-7959
eISSN
1568-539X
DOI
10.1163/156853907783244701
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Acquisition of foraging competence in wild brown capuchins ( Cebus apella ), with special reference to conspecifics’ foraging artefacts as an indirect social influence Noëlle Gunst 1,4) , Sue Boinski 2) & Dorothy M. Fragaszy 3) ( 1 Institute of Ecology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA; 2 Department of Anthropology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; 3 Department of Psychology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA) (Accepted: 22 October 2007) Summary Wild brown capuchins ( Cebus apella ) in Raleighvallen, Suriname forage on larvae hidden in- side bamboo stalks via searching and extractive behaviours. We found that developing profi- ciency at obtaining larvae from bamboo stalks extends through several years of juvenescence. Older juveniles pass through a transition from a juvenile pattern to an adult pattern of forag- ing efficiency and diet selection. Whereas most studies have investigated the contribution of direct interactions between a naïve individual and a competent forager on the acquisition of foraging expertise, we focused on indirect social influence through foraging artefacts left in the habitat by conspecifics. Young individuals foraged at bamboo stalks more often shortly after than shortly before encountering bamboo segments previously opened by foragers to extract larvae. We discuss

Journal

BehaviourBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2008

Keywords: AGE DIFFERENCES; FORAGING ARTEFACTS; PHYSICAL MATURATION; EXTRACTIVE FORAGING; SOCIAL FACILITATION

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