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Achieving Equality for the Sinti and Roma of Schleswig-Holstein

Achieving Equality for the Sinti and Roma of Schleswig-Holstein B. NATIONAL DEVELOPMENTS Tove H. Malloy* I. Introduction¹ The German Land Schleswig-Holstein officially recognised the German citizens of Sinti and Roma background residing in Schleswig-Holstein in 2012. SchleswigHolstein is home to three national minorities. The largest minority, the Danish, is estimated to consist of around 50.000 persons, the North Frisian minority of around 10.000, and the Sinti and Roma of approximately 5.000. All three minorities are officially recognized by the Federal Republic of Germany.² The Danish and North Frisian minorities were furthermore mentioned in the Constitution of Schleswig-Holstein in 1990 after a revision of the Constitution. On 14 November 2012, the Schleswig-Holstein regional parliament, the Landtag, adopted an unanimous decision to include the Sinti and Roma in the Constitution. The decision put the Sinti and Roma on equal status with the other minorities in the Land and represented the fruits of more than twenty years of petitioning the various governments. The Sinti and Roma have been present in Schleswig-Holstein since the fifteenth century. From the nineteenth century onward, the Sinti and Roma communities in Schleswig-Holstein settled near the larger cities of Kiel and Lübeck, which offered economic opportunities. After World War II, Sinti and Roma survivors of the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Yearbook of Minority Issues Online Brill

Achieving Equality for the Sinti and Roma of Schleswig-Holstein

European Yearbook of Minority Issues Online , Volume 11 (1): 327 – Nov 17, 2014

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Copyright 2014 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1570-7865
eISSN
2211-6117
DOI
10.1163/22116117-90110051
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

B. NATIONAL DEVELOPMENTS Tove H. Malloy* I. Introduction¹ The German Land Schleswig-Holstein officially recognised the German citizens of Sinti and Roma background residing in Schleswig-Holstein in 2012. SchleswigHolstein is home to three national minorities. The largest minority, the Danish, is estimated to consist of around 50.000 persons, the North Frisian minority of around 10.000, and the Sinti and Roma of approximately 5.000. All three minorities are officially recognized by the Federal Republic of Germany.² The Danish and North Frisian minorities were furthermore mentioned in the Constitution of Schleswig-Holstein in 1990 after a revision of the Constitution. On 14 November 2012, the Schleswig-Holstein regional parliament, the Landtag, adopted an unanimous decision to include the Sinti and Roma in the Constitution. The decision put the Sinti and Roma on equal status with the other minorities in the Land and represented the fruits of more than twenty years of petitioning the various governments. The Sinti and Roma have been present in Schleswig-Holstein since the fifteenth century. From the nineteenth century onward, the Sinti and Roma communities in Schleswig-Holstein settled near the larger cities of Kiel and Lübeck, which offered economic opportunities. After World War II, Sinti and Roma survivors of the

Journal

European Yearbook of Minority Issues OnlineBrill

Published: Nov 17, 2014

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