Abstract Index Part 3 Volume 99

Abstract Index Part 3 Volume 99 VOLUME 99 739 Behaviour Vol. 99 (1986) pp. 1-21 FORAGING PATH SELECTION IN BUMBLEBEES: HINDSIGHT OR FORESIGHT? ROBERTA LYNN SOLTZ Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Irvine, California, U.S.A. In orescence richness and density did not effect the magnitude or variation in magnitude of the turn- ing angles between in orescences in the paths of foraging bumblebees. The pooled data indicated that bumblebees tended to move straight through the Vicia patch regardless of raceme density. The angular distributions from the Ž eld data were similar to those derived from a computer model in which consumers just visited the nearest in orescences provided that they revisited few  owers. These results imply that the foraging paths of bumblebees may be determined, in part, by a tendency to visit nearest in orescences. The distribution of turning angles from individual rather than pooled data, however, suggest that active selection of in orescences with between two and six  owers may also play a role in determining the for- aging path. I found no evidence for area-restricted foraging. This may be due to the heterogeneity of the natural resource patches. Behaviour Vol. 99 (1986) pp. 22-45 HOME RANGE SIZE, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behaviour Brill

Abstract Index Part 3 Volume 99

Behaviour , Volume 136 (12): 739 – Jan 1, 1999

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Publisher
BRILL
Copyright
© 1999 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0005-7959
eISSN
1568-539X
D.O.I.
10.1163/156853999500839
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

VOLUME 99 739 Behaviour Vol. 99 (1986) pp. 1-21 FORAGING PATH SELECTION IN BUMBLEBEES: HINDSIGHT OR FORESIGHT? ROBERTA LYNN SOLTZ Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Irvine, California, U.S.A. In orescence richness and density did not effect the magnitude or variation in magnitude of the turn- ing angles between in orescences in the paths of foraging bumblebees. The pooled data indicated that bumblebees tended to move straight through the Vicia patch regardless of raceme density. The angular distributions from the Ž eld data were similar to those derived from a computer model in which consumers just visited the nearest in orescences provided that they revisited few  owers. These results imply that the foraging paths of bumblebees may be determined, in part, by a tendency to visit nearest in orescences. The distribution of turning angles from individual rather than pooled data, however, suggest that active selection of in orescences with between two and six  owers may also play a role in determining the for- aging path. I found no evidence for area-restricted foraging. This may be due to the heterogeneity of the natural resource patches. Behaviour Vol. 99 (1986) pp. 22-45 HOME RANGE SIZE,

Journal

BehaviourBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1999

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