Abiotic or bacterial degradation?

Abiotic or bacterial degradation? IAWA 336 Journal, Vol. 29 (3), 2008: 336­338 IAWA Journal, Vol. 29 (3), 2008 Short Note Thomas Nilsson1 and René K.W.M. Klaassen 2 Comments on the paper by Cufar et al. 2008, "Anatomy, cell wall structure and topochemistry of water-logged archaeological wood aged 5,200 and 4,500 years" in IAWA Journal 29 (1), pp. 55­68. In this paper the authors describe and illustrate extensive cell wall degradation in old ash and oak wood buried in water-logged conditions for a long time. A typical feature was that the middle lamella appeared structurally intact, a feature that excludes pre-burial attack by white rot fungi. The authors concluded that the degraded "structures of the samples are consistent with abiotic rather than bacterial degradation". This conclusion was based on the fact that their light and electron microscopic analyses showed no evidence of bacterial decay. We are convinced that most of the extensive degradation described has been caused by bacteria. Before the 1990s it was commonly assumed that the degradation observed in wood after a long time in water-logged condition was due to hydrolysis (Hoffmann & Jones 1990). However, no facts supporting this assumption have been presented. As far as we know there are http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png IAWA Journal Brill

Abiotic or bacterial degradation?

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/abiotic-or-bacterial-degradation-5lQHMUCWEx
Publisher
BRILL
Copyright
Copyright 2008 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0928-1541
eISSN
2294-1932
D.O.I.
10.1163/22941932-90000191
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IAWA 336 Journal, Vol. 29 (3), 2008: 336­338 IAWA Journal, Vol. 29 (3), 2008 Short Note Thomas Nilsson1 and René K.W.M. Klaassen 2 Comments on the paper by Cufar et al. 2008, "Anatomy, cell wall structure and topochemistry of water-logged archaeological wood aged 5,200 and 4,500 years" in IAWA Journal 29 (1), pp. 55­68. In this paper the authors describe and illustrate extensive cell wall degradation in old ash and oak wood buried in water-logged conditions for a long time. A typical feature was that the middle lamella appeared structurally intact, a feature that excludes pre-burial attack by white rot fungi. The authors concluded that the degraded "structures of the samples are consistent with abiotic rather than bacterial degradation". This conclusion was based on the fact that their light and electron microscopic analyses showed no evidence of bacterial decay. We are convinced that most of the extensive degradation described has been caused by bacteria. Before the 1990s it was commonly assumed that the degradation observed in wood after a long time in water-logged condition was due to hydrolysis (Hoffmann & Jones 1990). However, no facts supporting this assumption have been presented. As far as we know there are

Journal

IAWA JournalBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2008

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed
Create lists to
organize your research
Export lists, citations
Read DeepDyve articles
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off