A Tale of Estrangement. Husserl and Contemporary Philosophy

A Tale of Estrangement. Husserl and Contemporary Philosophy 13 A Tale of Estrangement. Husserl and Contemporary Philosophy. RUDOLF BOEHM University of Ghent I. Husserl's story. Husserl's last work' is the only one he himself called, in sub-title, an "Introduction to Phenomenological Philosophy."2 Already in 1913, he distinguished between "pure phenomenology" and "phenomenological philosophy."' The book he published then was called only "A General Introduction to Pure Phenomenology."4 It presents "pure phenomenology" merely as a possible new approach to "the given." In order to give this phenomenological approach a philosophical meaning, it remained to be shown that this approach was necessary. Husserl intended to do this in the "Third Book" of a greater work which is announced in the "Introduction" to the "First Book" published in 1913. This "Third Book," he never wrote. In 1923/24, he tried to fill up this gap by elaborating his lectures on "First Philosophy."' By way of a "Critical History of Ideas," the first part of the lectures, he sets out to demonstrate that the classical ideal of European philosophy, due to Plato and Aristotle, cannot be finally realized without putting to work the two main methods of pure phenomenology: the eidetic and the specifically phenomenological reduction. Traditional philosophy, Husserl wants to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

A Tale of Estrangement. Husserl and Contemporary Philosophy

Research in Phenomenology, Volume 12 (1): 13 – Jan 1, 1982

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1982 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
D.O.I.
10.1163/156916482X00026
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

13 A Tale of Estrangement. Husserl and Contemporary Philosophy. RUDOLF BOEHM University of Ghent I. Husserl's story. Husserl's last work' is the only one he himself called, in sub-title, an "Introduction to Phenomenological Philosophy."2 Already in 1913, he distinguished between "pure phenomenology" and "phenomenological philosophy."' The book he published then was called only "A General Introduction to Pure Phenomenology."4 It presents "pure phenomenology" merely as a possible new approach to "the given." In order to give this phenomenological approach a philosophical meaning, it remained to be shown that this approach was necessary. Husserl intended to do this in the "Third Book" of a greater work which is announced in the "Introduction" to the "First Book" published in 1913. This "Third Book," he never wrote. In 1923/24, he tried to fill up this gap by elaborating his lectures on "First Philosophy."' By way of a "Critical History of Ideas," the first part of the lectures, he sets out to demonstrate that the classical ideal of European philosophy, due to Plato and Aristotle, cannot be finally realized without putting to work the two main methods of pure phenomenology: the eidetic and the specifically phenomenological reduction. Traditional philosophy, Husserl wants to

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1982

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