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A Symposium: Governance, Climate Change, and the Challenge for Copenhagen

A Symposium: Governance, Climate Change, and the Challenge for Copenhagen Global Governance 15 (2009), 425 GLOBAL INSIGHTS A Symposium: Governance, Climate Change, and the Challenge for Copenhagen the Editors he issues surrounding climate change, energy security, and develop- ment seem intractable. Contention surrounds the setting and monitoring of national emission targets, the legal basis of compliance provisions, arrangements for financial flows for mitigation and adaptation, measures for technology transfer, and provisions for access to intellectual property. How can research and development efforts be most effectively pooled? What are the international requirements to prevent deforestation and promote carbon sinks? Will the current set of international institutions and arrangements be adequate to the challenge? Global Governance invited five people from different backgrounds and different parts of the world to contribute to this forum on the desirable global governance responses to climate change. Envisioning the likely outcome of the imminent international negotiations, what are the desirable institutional organ- izations, mechanisms, and arrangements needed to effectively and legitimately implement any deal to be reached at Copenhagen or subsequently? What are the required dimensions to provide for participation, transparency, and accounta- bility? What governance arrangements would be desirable to assure monitoring of implementation and enforcement of commitments? The following articles explore the differing perceptions of the dilemma and describe the prerequisites of leadership and institutional innovation. They enrich the debate with insights into the nature of the problem and ideas and signposts for a successful outcome in the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change process. c http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-01504001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Global Governance 15 (2009), 425 GLOBAL INSIGHTS A Symposium: Governance, Climate Change, and the Challenge for Copenhagen the Editors he issues surrounding climate change, energy security, and develop- ment seem intractable. Contention surrounds the setting and monitoring of national emission targets, the legal basis of compliance provisions, arrangements for financial flows for mitigation and adaptation, measures for technology transfer, and provisions for access to intellectual property. How can research and development efforts be most effectively pooled? What are the international requirements to prevent deforestation and promote carbon sinks? Will the current set of international institutions and arrangements be adequate to the challenge? Global Governance invited five people from different backgrounds and different parts of the world to contribute to this forum on the desirable global governance responses to climate change. Envisioning the likely outcome of the imminent international negotiations, what are the desirable institutional organ- izations, mechanisms, and arrangements needed to effectively and legitimately implement any deal to be reached at Copenhagen or subsequently? What are the required dimensions to provide for participation, transparency, and accounta- bility? What governance arrangements would be desirable to assure monitoring of implementation and enforcement of commitments? The following articles explore the differing perceptions of the dilemma and describe the prerequisites of leadership and institutional innovation. They enrich the debate with insights into the nature of the problem and ideas and signposts for a successful outcome in the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change process. c

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Aug 12, 2009

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