Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

A Role for Legislators

A Role for Legislators Global Governance 15 (2009), 451-455 GLOBAL INSIGHTS Adam Matthews e are living in a world that is facing multiple global challenges: the economic downturn, climate change, energy security, poverty, and W ecosystem breakdown. Each of these challenges requires an un- precedented political response, a daunting prospect when viewed together. Our main difficulty is not that these challenges are insoluble—they are not. In- stead, it is the fact that we are facing these modern-day challenges while using institutional frameworks and governmental structures that were designed for a post–World War II equilibrium. The existing international bodies responsible for tackling these current challenges are separate, disparate, and not suffi- ciently “joined up.” We have the Group of 20 (G-20), the International Mone- tary Fund, and World Bank for the financial crisis; the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), G8, and Major Economies Forum for climate change; the International Energy Agency (IEA), and G8 for energy security; the UN Development Programme and World Bank for poverty; and the UN Convention on Biological Diversity for ecosystems. Each of these or- ganizations is doing important work, but many are working with considerable constraint on issues that require a unified policy response. As a result, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/a-role-for-legislators-gh4aZYpnoM
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-01504005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Global Governance 15 (2009), 451-455 GLOBAL INSIGHTS Adam Matthews e are living in a world that is facing multiple global challenges: the economic downturn, climate change, energy security, poverty, and W ecosystem breakdown. Each of these challenges requires an un- precedented political response, a daunting prospect when viewed together. Our main difficulty is not that these challenges are insoluble—they are not. In- stead, it is the fact that we are facing these modern-day challenges while using institutional frameworks and governmental structures that were designed for a post–World War II equilibrium. The existing international bodies responsible for tackling these current challenges are separate, disparate, and not suffi- ciently “joined up.” We have the Group of 20 (G-20), the International Mone- tary Fund, and World Bank for the financial crisis; the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), G8, and Major Economies Forum for climate change; the International Energy Agency (IEA), and G8 for energy security; the UN Development Programme and World Bank for poverty; and the UN Convention on Biological Diversity for ecosystems. Each of these or- ganizations is doing important work, but many are working with considerable constraint on issues that require a unified policy response. As a result,

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Aug 12, 2009

There are no references for this article.