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A Reconstruction of Freedom in the Age of Neuroscience: A View from Neuropragmatism

A Reconstruction of Freedom in the Age of Neuroscience: A View from Neuropragmatism Contemporary Pragmatism Vol. 8, No. 1 (June 2011), 153­171 Editions Rodopi © 2011 Pragmatism has resurged explicitly in neopragmatism and implicitly in neurophilosophy. Neopragmatists have focused primarily on ideals, like human freedom, but at the expense of science. Neurophilosophers have focused primarily on scientific facts, but with an eye toward dismissing aspects of our self-conception like free will as illusory. In both cases, these resurgences are impoverished as each neglects what Dewey referred to as the method of intelligence. Neurophilosophical pragmatism ­ neuropragmatism ­ aims to overcome the deficiencies of neopragmatism and neurophilosophy by carrying forth the project of reconstruction by taking both the methods and results of experimental inquiry as the means for attaining ends-in-view such as human freedom. Reconstruction is in the air. While working on this particular essay and its larger project, I was quite pleased to see Philip Kitcher's recent piece1 inspired by John Dewey's book, Reconstruction in Philosophy.2 Such clarion calls about the present and future state of philosophy often connect to Dewey. Such a call is particularly pressing in light of the enthusiasm and hype over the advances and promises of the neurosciences. Neuro-enthusiasts address the questions of everyday people that Kitcher http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Pragmatism Brill

A Reconstruction of Freedom in the Age of Neuroscience: A View from Neuropragmatism

Contemporary Pragmatism , Volume 8 (1): 153 – Apr 21, 2011

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Copyright 2011 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1572-3429
eISSN
1875-8185
DOI
10.1163/18758185-90000188
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Contemporary Pragmatism Vol. 8, No. 1 (June 2011), 153­171 Editions Rodopi © 2011 Pragmatism has resurged explicitly in neopragmatism and implicitly in neurophilosophy. Neopragmatists have focused primarily on ideals, like human freedom, but at the expense of science. Neurophilosophers have focused primarily on scientific facts, but with an eye toward dismissing aspects of our self-conception like free will as illusory. In both cases, these resurgences are impoverished as each neglects what Dewey referred to as the method of intelligence. Neurophilosophical pragmatism ­ neuropragmatism ­ aims to overcome the deficiencies of neopragmatism and neurophilosophy by carrying forth the project of reconstruction by taking both the methods and results of experimental inquiry as the means for attaining ends-in-view such as human freedom. Reconstruction is in the air. While working on this particular essay and its larger project, I was quite pleased to see Philip Kitcher's recent piece1 inspired by John Dewey's book, Reconstruction in Philosophy.2 Such clarion calls about the present and future state of philosophy often connect to Dewey. Such a call is particularly pressing in light of the enthusiasm and hype over the advances and promises of the neurosciences. Neuro-enthusiasts address the questions of everyday people that Kitcher

Journal

Contemporary PragmatismBrill

Published: Apr 21, 2011

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