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A Pottery Corpus for Daima

A Pottery Corpus for Daima A complete set of drawings of the pottery excavated from the Daima mound in 1966 is presented here for the first time. Previously only a small selection of these has been available in a published form. The drawings provide a visual guide to the ceramic sequence at this site from the first millennium BC to the early part of the second millennium AD. In general it can be seen that flat-based pots, three-legged pots, carved roulettes and nodular roulettes characterized the third phase of the site; the first appearance of twisted cord roulettes occurred in the second phase; and comb-stamping and comb-drawing were most common in the first and second phases. In addition there was a gradual change throughout the sequence from smaller vessels of fine ware to larger ones of coarser fabric. Overall, it is hoped that these illustrations will contribute to the growth of comparative ceramic studies of the last three millennia in the West African Sahel. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of African Archaeology Brill

A Pottery Corpus for Daima

Journal of African Archaeology , Volume 5 (2): 245 – Nov 1, 2007

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Copyright 2007 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1612-1651
eISSN
2191-5784
DOI
10.3213/1612-1651-10094
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A complete set of drawings of the pottery excavated from the Daima mound in 1966 is presented here for the first time. Previously only a small selection of these has been available in a published form. The drawings provide a visual guide to the ceramic sequence at this site from the first millennium BC to the early part of the second millennium AD. In general it can be seen that flat-based pots, three-legged pots, carved roulettes and nodular roulettes characterized the third phase of the site; the first appearance of twisted cord roulettes occurred in the second phase; and comb-stamping and comb-drawing were most common in the first and second phases. In addition there was a gradual change throughout the sequence from smaller vessels of fine ware to larger ones of coarser fabric. Overall, it is hoped that these illustrations will contribute to the growth of comparative ceramic studies of the last three millennia in the West African Sahel.

Journal

Journal of African ArchaeologyBrill

Published: Nov 1, 2007

Keywords: Pottery; Daima; Borno; Nigeria; archaeological archives

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