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A Possible Trace of Oresme’s Condicio-Theory of Accidents in an Anonymous Commentary on Aristotle’s Meteorology

A Possible Trace of Oresme’s Condicio-Theory of Accidents in an Anonymous Commentary on... <jats:sec><jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>In his commentary on Aristotle’s Physics, Nicole Oresme (c. 1320-1382) propounds a very specific theory of the ontological status of accidents. Characteristic of Oresme’s view on accidents is that he does not consider them accidental forms, but only so-called condiciones or modi of the substance. Unlike the term “modus”, the term “condicio” seems to be very characteristic of Oresme’s own terminology. Up to now it has been unknown whether Oresme exerted any influence with his condicio-theory of accidents. This paper presents an anonymous 14th-century commentary on Aristotle’s Meteorology (Munich, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Clm 4375, ff. 19r-46v), in two Questions of which the term “condicio” occurs in an ontological context. Moreover, the text shows further striking coincidences with known works by Oresme, and this makes an influence by Oresme appear all the more probable.</jats:p> </jats:sec> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Vivarium Brill

A Possible Trace of Oresme’s Condicio-Theory of Accidents in an Anonymous Commentary on Aristotle’s Meteorology

Vivarium , Volume 48 (3): 349 – Jan 1, 2010

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2010 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0042-7543
eISSN
1568-5349
DOI
10.1163/156853410X505908
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

<jats:sec><jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>In his commentary on Aristotle’s Physics, Nicole Oresme (c. 1320-1382) propounds a very specific theory of the ontological status of accidents. Characteristic of Oresme’s view on accidents is that he does not consider them accidental forms, but only so-called condiciones or modi of the substance. Unlike the term “modus”, the term “condicio” seems to be very characteristic of Oresme’s own terminology. Up to now it has been unknown whether Oresme exerted any influence with his condicio-theory of accidents. This paper presents an anonymous 14th-century commentary on Aristotle’s Meteorology (Munich, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, Clm 4375, ff. 19r-46v), in two Questions of which the term “condicio” occurs in an ontological context. Moreover, the text shows further striking coincidences with known works by Oresme, and this makes an influence by Oresme appear all the more probable.</jats:p> </jats:sec>

Journal

VivariumBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2010

Keywords: ontology of accidents; condicio-theory of accidents; Nicole Oresme

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