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A Multi-Voiced Book

A Multi-Voiced Book Review Articles / Research in Phenomenology 41 (2011) 109–154 119 A Multi-Voiced Book Fred Evans. The Multivoiced Body: Society and Communication in the Age of Diversity. New York: Columbia University Press, 2008. xi + 352 pp. The first thing that strikes the reader about Fred Evan’s book The Multivoiced Body is that, as Nelson Goodman might have said, it exemplifies what it expresses. The book develops a theory of society as a “multivoiced body,” but in the process of developing this theory, Evans engages with an almost over- whelming array of voices in contemporary philosophy, including—to give just a short list—not just continental philosophers (such as Foucault, Derrida, Lyotard, Deleuze and Guattari, Merleau-Ponty, Agamben, Levinas, Jean-Luc Nancy, Judith Butler, and Adriana Cavaroro), or historical figures (such as Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Descartes, Kant, Hegel, Husserl, and Heidegger), but also cognitive scientists (such as Andy Clark, Paul Churchland, and Dan- iel Dennett), linguists (such as Bakhtin and Saussure), and philosophers of science (such as Thomas Kuhn, Bruno Latour, and David Bloor). Evans has read all these thinkers carefully, and in the book we not only get precise sum- maries and discussions of each of the figures but also insightful reflections— http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

A Multi-Voiced Book

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 41 (1): 119 – Jan 1, 2011

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2011 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916411X558936
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Review Articles / Research in Phenomenology 41 (2011) 109–154 119 A Multi-Voiced Book Fred Evans. The Multivoiced Body: Society and Communication in the Age of Diversity. New York: Columbia University Press, 2008. xi + 352 pp. The first thing that strikes the reader about Fred Evan’s book The Multivoiced Body is that, as Nelson Goodman might have said, it exemplifies what it expresses. The book develops a theory of society as a “multivoiced body,” but in the process of developing this theory, Evans engages with an almost over- whelming array of voices in contemporary philosophy, including—to give just a short list—not just continental philosophers (such as Foucault, Derrida, Lyotard, Deleuze and Guattari, Merleau-Ponty, Agamben, Levinas, Jean-Luc Nancy, Judith Butler, and Adriana Cavaroro), or historical figures (such as Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Descartes, Kant, Hegel, Husserl, and Heidegger), but also cognitive scientists (such as Andy Clark, Paul Churchland, and Dan- iel Dennett), linguists (such as Bakhtin and Saussure), and philosophers of science (such as Thomas Kuhn, Bruno Latour, and David Bloor). Evans has read all these thinkers carefully, and in the book we not only get precise sum- maries and discussions of each of the figures but also insightful reflections—

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2011

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