A model of human pattern perception: association fields for adaptive spatial filters

A model of human pattern perception: association fields for adaptive spatial filters A model of human pattern perception: association fields for adaptive spatial filters TIM S. MEESE * Vision Sciences, School of Life and Health Sciences, Aston University, Aston Triangle, Birmingham B4 7ET, UK Received 1 May 1998; revised 25 January 1999; accepted 8 March 1999 Abstract-Visual neurons in the primary visual cortex 'look' at the retinal image through a four- dimensional array of spatial receptive fields (filter-elements): two spatial dimensions and, at each spatial location, two Fourier dimensions of spatial frequency and orientation. In general, visual objects activate filter-elements along each of these dimensions, suggesting a need for some kind of linking mechanism that determines whether two or more filter-elements are responding to the same or different contours or objects. In the spatial domain, a (spatial) association field between filter-elements, arranged to form first-order curves, has been inferred as a flexible method by which different parts of extended (luminance) contours become associated (Field et al., 1993). Linking has also been explored between filters selective for different regions in Fourier space (e.g. Georgeson and Meese, 1997). Perceived structure of stationary plaids suggests that spatial filtering is adaptive: synthetic filters can be created by the linear summation of basis-filters across orientation http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Spatial Vision (continued as Seeing & Perceiving from 2010) Brill

A model of human pattern perception: association fields for adaptive spatial filters

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1999 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0169-1015
eISSN
1568-5683
D.O.I.
10.1163/156856899X00210
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A model of human pattern perception: association fields for adaptive spatial filters TIM S. MEESE * Vision Sciences, School of Life and Health Sciences, Aston University, Aston Triangle, Birmingham B4 7ET, UK Received 1 May 1998; revised 25 January 1999; accepted 8 March 1999 Abstract-Visual neurons in the primary visual cortex 'look' at the retinal image through a four- dimensional array of spatial receptive fields (filter-elements): two spatial dimensions and, at each spatial location, two Fourier dimensions of spatial frequency and orientation. In general, visual objects activate filter-elements along each of these dimensions, suggesting a need for some kind of linking mechanism that determines whether two or more filter-elements are responding to the same or different contours or objects. In the spatial domain, a (spatial) association field between filter-elements, arranged to form first-order curves, has been inferred as a flexible method by which different parts of extended (luminance) contours become associated (Field et al., 1993). Linking has also been explored between filters selective for different regions in Fourier space (e.g. Georgeson and Meese, 1997). Perceived structure of stationary plaids suggests that spatial filtering is adaptive: synthetic filters can be created by the linear summation of basis-filters across orientation

Journal

Spatial Vision (continued as Seeing & Perceiving from 2010)Brill

Published: Jan 1, 1999

Keywords: edge detection; segmentation; binding; plaid; Association field; adaptive filters; linking

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