A Historian's Response

A Historian's Response © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2008 DOI: 10.1163/157007408X346384 Pneuma 30 (2008) 245-254 www.brill.nl/pneu A Historian’s Response Daniel Ramírez Arizona State University, Phoenix, Arizona 85287, USA Daniel.Ramirez.1@asu.edu Introduction This response reflects the concerns of a social historian. This disciplinary van- tage point prompts me to point to data that theologians often overlook, ignore, or dismiss. My comments pertain more to the process rather than the content of the Dialogue. True dialogue entails hard work and a measure of symmetry. As evident from other instances of ostensible religious dialogue (e.g., Franciscan friars and Aztec nobles in Mexico, Spanish conquistadors, Dominican priests and Incan leaders in Peru), disparate existential circumstances can make for vastly different ways of seeing the world and one’s place in it, for different questions that one sees fit to pose to that world, and for different ways of comprehending an other’s understanding about that world. 1 Scholars are not exempt from these epistemological and ideological constraints; one’s social and intellectual formation and position can obscure the broader picture and limit one’s view of other ships passing by. History is replete with examples of this incommensurability. Mindful of this, I propose to address the following questions: Is the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pneuma Brill

A Historian's Response

Pneuma, Volume 30 (2): 245 – Jan 1, 2008

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2008 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0272-0965
eISSN
1570-0747
D.O.I.
10.1163/157007408X346384
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2008 DOI: 10.1163/157007408X346384 Pneuma 30 (2008) 245-254 www.brill.nl/pneu A Historian’s Response Daniel Ramírez Arizona State University, Phoenix, Arizona 85287, USA Daniel.Ramirez.1@asu.edu Introduction This response reflects the concerns of a social historian. This disciplinary van- tage point prompts me to point to data that theologians often overlook, ignore, or dismiss. My comments pertain more to the process rather than the content of the Dialogue. True dialogue entails hard work and a measure of symmetry. As evident from other instances of ostensible religious dialogue (e.g., Franciscan friars and Aztec nobles in Mexico, Spanish conquistadors, Dominican priests and Incan leaders in Peru), disparate existential circumstances can make for vastly different ways of seeing the world and one’s place in it, for different questions that one sees fit to pose to that world, and for different ways of comprehending an other’s understanding about that world. 1 Scholars are not exempt from these epistemological and ideological constraints; one’s social and intellectual formation and position can obscure the broader picture and limit one’s view of other ships passing by. History is replete with examples of this incommensurability. Mindful of this, I propose to address the following questions: Is the

Journal

PneumaBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2008

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