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A Ding Ware Dish with a Scalloped Rim

A Ding Ware Dish with a Scalloped Rim Ching-Ling Wang Ding ware is one of the five most famous types of ceramics (the others are Ru ware, Ding ware, guan ware, Jun ware and ge ware) of the Song dynasty (960–1279) and was the most outstanding white stoneware of its time. The use of Ding ware in the Northern Song (960–1127) imperial household testifies to its high quality. It was the most distinctive of the many white wares in China. As Cao zhao mentioned in his Gegu yaolun, a treatise on collecting and assessing antiques published in 1388: Of ancient Ding ware, specimens with a fine (and unctuous) paste and white and lustrous glaze are valuable; while those which are coarse and yellow in colour are less so. genuine pieces have ‘tear drops’ (leihen) on the outside. The best have incised designs; the second best are plain; and of third quality are those with very elaborate patterns (xiuhua) [impressed patterns]. The best Ding wares were produced in the Xuanhe and zhenghe reign-periods (1119-1125 and 1111-1117 respectively), but it is very difficult to produce them in sets. There are also purple Ding and ink Ding wares, the latter as black as lacquer. Their paste, however, is white. Like http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aziatische Kunst Brill

A Ding Ware Dish with a Scalloped Rim

Aziatische Kunst , Volume 48 (2): 2 – Oct 24, 2018

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
eISSN
2543-1749
DOI
10.3868/25431749-04802013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Ching-Ling Wang Ding ware is one of the five most famous types of ceramics (the others are Ru ware, Ding ware, guan ware, Jun ware and ge ware) of the Song dynasty (960–1279) and was the most outstanding white stoneware of its time. The use of Ding ware in the Northern Song (960–1127) imperial household testifies to its high quality. It was the most distinctive of the many white wares in China. As Cao zhao mentioned in his Gegu yaolun, a treatise on collecting and assessing antiques published in 1388: Of ancient Ding ware, specimens with a fine (and unctuous) paste and white and lustrous glaze are valuable; while those which are coarse and yellow in colour are less so. genuine pieces have ‘tear drops’ (leihen) on the outside. The best have incised designs; the second best are plain; and of third quality are those with very elaborate patterns (xiuhua) [impressed patterns]. The best Ding wares were produced in the Xuanhe and zhenghe reign-periods (1119-1125 and 1111-1117 respectively), but it is very difficult to produce them in sets. There are also purple Ding and ink Ding wares, the latter as black as lacquer. Their paste, however, is white. Like

Journal

Aziatische KunstBrill

Published: Oct 24, 2018

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