A Biostatistical Study of the Functional Consistency in the Reversed Claws of the Adult Male Stone Crabs, Menippe Mercenaria (Say) 1)

A Biostatistical Study of the Functional Consistency in the Reversed Claws of the Adult Male... A BIOSTATISTICAL STUDY OF THE FUNCTIONAL CONSISTENCY IN THE REVERSED CLAWS OF THE ADULT MALE STONE CRABS, MENIPPE MERCENARIA (SAY) 1) BY T. S. CHEUNG Department of Biostatistics & Epidemiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont., Canada Although the classical problem of claw reversal in decapod crustaceans has been well-known (Bliss, 1960; Huxley, 1932; Needham, 1952, 1965; Przibram, 1931; etc.), no quantitative study has ever been made on this subject. Many fundamental questions have still not yet been answered. For one thing, substantial evidence is still lacking on its functional adaptation. For the other, the roles of genetic and hormonal systems on the control of the phenomenon are still unknown. From the authors cited above, we are familiar with the fact that in many crabs and lobsters possessing asymmetrical claws, the larger claw in general acts as a crusher, and its smaller partner as a pincer. Depending on the age of the animal, removal of the crusher will lead to the formation of a new crusher either ( 1 ) by regeneration or (2) through subsequent development of the remaining claw, the pincer into a new crusher, with the lost crusher replaced by a regenerated pincer (Przibram, 1931; ' Huxley, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Crustaceana Brill

A Biostatistical Study of the Functional Consistency in the Reversed Claws of the Adult Male Stone Crabs, Menippe Mercenaria (Say) 1)

Crustaceana , Volume 31 (2): 137 – Jan 1, 1976

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1976 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0011-216x
eISSN
1568-5403
D.O.I.
10.1163/156854076X00161
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A BIOSTATISTICAL STUDY OF THE FUNCTIONAL CONSISTENCY IN THE REVERSED CLAWS OF THE ADULT MALE STONE CRABS, MENIPPE MERCENARIA (SAY) 1) BY T. S. CHEUNG Department of Biostatistics & Epidemiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont., Canada Although the classical problem of claw reversal in decapod crustaceans has been well-known (Bliss, 1960; Huxley, 1932; Needham, 1952, 1965; Przibram, 1931; etc.), no quantitative study has ever been made on this subject. Many fundamental questions have still not yet been answered. For one thing, substantial evidence is still lacking on its functional adaptation. For the other, the roles of genetic and hormonal systems on the control of the phenomenon are still unknown. From the authors cited above, we are familiar with the fact that in many crabs and lobsters possessing asymmetrical claws, the larger claw in general acts as a crusher, and its smaller partner as a pincer. Depending on the age of the animal, removal of the crusher will lead to the formation of a new crusher either ( 1 ) by regeneration or (2) through subsequent development of the remaining claw, the pincer into a new crusher, with the lost crusher replaced by a regenerated pincer (Przibram, 1931; ' Huxley,

Journal

CrustaceanaBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1976

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