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A Banner Year for Conventional Arms Control? The Arms Trade Treaty and the Small Arms Challenge

A Banner Year for Conventional Arms Control? The Arms Trade Treaty and the Small Arms Challenge Global Governance 20 (2014), 203–212 THE GLOBAL FORUM A Banner Year for Conventional Arms Control? The Arms Trade Treaty and the Small Arms Challenge Paul Meyer THE CONTROL OF CONVENTIONAL ARMS HAS OFTEN SEEMED THE POOR COUSIN of the global efforts to control weapons of mass destruction (WMD). Since the advent of the atomic era, the focus of arms control and disarmament activity has been overwhelmingly on nuclear weapons and their lesser, if still ugly, stepsisters of biological and chemical weapons. The initial multilateral arms control agreements concerned themselves with limits on the testing of nuclear weapons and, shortly thereafter, with their nonproliferation (e.g., the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty of 1968). Bilateral US-Soviet/Russian arms control arrangements also predominantly dealt with the reduction of strate- gic nuclear forces and restraints on deployments of defenses against (nuclear- tipped) ballistic missiles. Efforts to reduce major conventional weapon systems were also taken up in the 1980s in the context of negotiations between the opposing alliances of NATO and the Warsaw Pact, eventually culminating in the Treaty on Conventional Forces in Europe (CFE Treaty) of 1989. This treaty provided for a massive reduction in the conventional forces that had confronted each other for years in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

A Banner Year for Conventional Arms Control? The Arms Trade Treaty and the Small Arms Challenge

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-02002003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Global Governance 20 (2014), 203–212 THE GLOBAL FORUM A Banner Year for Conventional Arms Control? The Arms Trade Treaty and the Small Arms Challenge Paul Meyer THE CONTROL OF CONVENTIONAL ARMS HAS OFTEN SEEMED THE POOR COUSIN of the global efforts to control weapons of mass destruction (WMD). Since the advent of the atomic era, the focus of arms control and disarmament activity has been overwhelmingly on nuclear weapons and their lesser, if still ugly, stepsisters of biological and chemical weapons. The initial multilateral arms control agreements concerned themselves with limits on the testing of nuclear weapons and, shortly thereafter, with their nonproliferation (e.g., the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty of 1968). Bilateral US-Soviet/Russian arms control arrangements also predominantly dealt with the reduction of strate- gic nuclear forces and restraints on deployments of defenses against (nuclear- tipped) ballistic missiles. Efforts to reduce major conventional weapon systems were also taken up in the 1980s in the context of negotiations between the opposing alliances of NATO and the Warsaw Pact, eventually culminating in the Treaty on Conventional Forces in Europe (CFE Treaty) of 1989. This treaty provided for a massive reduction in the conventional forces that had confronted each other for years in

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Aug 19, 2014

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