1939-1945: Environmental Aspects of the War in Europe

1939-1945: Environmental Aspects of the War in Europe DOI: 10.1163/092598806X111622 © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2006 Review of Central and East European Law 31 (2006) 111-125 1939-1945: Environmental Aspects of the War in Europe * Sergey N. Tikhomirov Abstract World War II made it clear that the realization of the potential of existing military technology and methods for using it—along with the extraction of natural resources during the prosecution of the war—constitute a man-made burden for the environment threatening the sustainability of the ecosystems of the combatant countries. The discovery of this danger to the environment was made possible by the implementation of the doctrine of “total destruction” that was conducted under Hitler’s direction. The subsequent sixty years have shown, however, that progress in society has been too slow with respect to the subordination of military expediency to environmental sensibility and the adoption of measures toward the ecolo- gization of armed combat. An important strategic resource for resolving the environmental problem of armed conflicts—time—is being lost much more quickly than states are taking steps aimed at the elimination of the threat that was revealed by World War II and that has increased multifold in the six intervening decades. Using historical hindsight, the author proposes his own http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Review of Central and East European Law Brill

1939-1945: Environmental Aspects of the War in Europe

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/1939-1945-environmental-aspects-of-the-war-in-europe-0a4sIEaZX0
Publisher
BRILL
Copyright
© 2006 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0925-9880
eISSN
1573-0352
D.O.I.
10.1163/092598806X111622
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

DOI: 10.1163/092598806X111622 © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2006 Review of Central and East European Law 31 (2006) 111-125 1939-1945: Environmental Aspects of the War in Europe * Sergey N. Tikhomirov Abstract World War II made it clear that the realization of the potential of existing military technology and methods for using it—along with the extraction of natural resources during the prosecution of the war—constitute a man-made burden for the environment threatening the sustainability of the ecosystems of the combatant countries. The discovery of this danger to the environment was made possible by the implementation of the doctrine of “total destruction” that was conducted under Hitler’s direction. The subsequent sixty years have shown, however, that progress in society has been too slow with respect to the subordination of military expediency to environmental sensibility and the adoption of measures toward the ecolo- gization of armed combat. An important strategic resource for resolving the environmental problem of armed conflicts—time—is being lost much more quickly than states are taking steps aimed at the elimination of the threat that was revealed by World War II and that has increased multifold in the six intervening decades. Using historical hindsight, the author proposes his own

Journal

Review of Central and East European LawBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2006

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off