The Psychical Analogon in Sartre's Theory of the Imagination

The Psychical Analogon in Sartre's Theory of the Imagination Sartre’s theory of the imagination is important both as an alternative to the idea that the imagination consists of images contained somehow in the mind – the “illusion of immanence” — and as an early formulation of Sartre’s conception of consciousness. In this paper I defend Sartre’s theory of imaginative consciousness against some of its critics. I show how difficulties with his theory parallel a perennial problem in Sartre-interpretation, that of understanding how consciousness can negate its past and posit possibilities beyond the facticity of its situation. In this short essay I will not provide a detailed exposition of Sartre’s theory of the imagination. Rather, I provide the basis of an interpretation of this theory that emphasizes the role that the past plays in imaginative consciousness. KEYWORDS: Sartre, Imagination, Temporality, Analogon, Past, Casey, Ricoeur, Kearney Sartre’s theory of the imagination, found in The Imaginary, is important both as an alternative to the idea that the imagination consists of images contained somehow in the mind – the “illusion of immanence” — and as an early formulation of Sartre’s conception of consciousness. In this paper, I will defend Sartre’s theory of imaginative consciousness. The main target for most of the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Sartre Studies International Berghahn Books

The Psychical Analogon in Sartre's Theory of the Imagination

Sartre Studies International, Volume 17 (2) – Jan 1, 2011

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Publisher
Berghahn Books
Copyright
© Berghahn Books
ISSN
1357-1559
eISSN
1558-5476
D.O.I.
10.3167/ssi.2011.170202
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Sartre’s theory of the imagination is important both as an alternative to the idea that the imagination consists of images contained somehow in the mind – the “illusion of immanence” — and as an early formulation of Sartre’s conception of consciousness. In this paper I defend Sartre’s theory of imaginative consciousness against some of its critics. I show how difficulties with his theory parallel a perennial problem in Sartre-interpretation, that of understanding how consciousness can negate its past and posit possibilities beyond the facticity of its situation. In this short essay I will not provide a detailed exposition of Sartre’s theory of the imagination. Rather, I provide the basis of an interpretation of this theory that emphasizes the role that the past plays in imaginative consciousness. KEYWORDS: Sartre, Imagination, Temporality, Analogon, Past, Casey, Ricoeur, Kearney Sartre’s theory of the imagination, found in The Imaginary, is important both as an alternative to the idea that the imagination consists of images contained somehow in the mind – the “illusion of immanence” — and as an early formulation of Sartre’s conception of consciousness. In this paper, I will defend Sartre’s theory of imaginative consciousness. The main target for most of the

Journal

Sartre Studies InternationalBerghahn Books

Published: Jan 1, 2011

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