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The maturing of romance in The Winter's Tale

The maturing of romance in The Winter's Tale The maturing of romance in The If the prevailing view that Shakespeare's comedies before 1600 are better plays than those of his last period were to be challenged on behalf of The , one reason would be that here he makes best use of the romance genre -- drawing benefit from his earlier ventures in that kind but going beyond them. For individual romance motifs, like the separation and reunion of lovers, the debt to the resources of the genre is plain enough. For the characteristic ideas and attitudes of romance the debt is less manifest, yet deeper. More fundamentally still, in overcoming the chief obstacles presented by romance to effective dramatization -- its diffuseness and its credulity -- Shakespeare does not evade or minimize them; instead, he exploits them to the fullest. R o m a n c e is indispensable to both structure and theme. I First, since "romance" is an elastic term, I list the main motifs and ideas which are characteristic of the genre and are exploited by Shakespeare for comedy. An inventory of motifs would include: duels, travels, wanderings, sea-journeys, storms, shipwrecks, exilings, disguises, monsters, fairies, philtres, poisons, oracles, riddles, hermits, courts, courtships, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Parergon Australian & New Zealand Association of Medieval & Early Modern Studies, Inc. (ANAZAMEMS, Inc.)

The maturing of romance in The Winter's Tale

Parergon , Volume 3 (1) – Apr 3, 1985

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Publisher
Australian & New Zealand Association of Medieval & Early Modern Studies, Inc. (ANAZAMEMS, Inc.)
Copyright
Copyright © The author
ISSN
1832-8334
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Abstract

The maturing of romance in The If the prevailing view that Shakespeare's comedies before 1600 are better plays than those of his last period were to be challenged on behalf of The , one reason would be that here he makes best use of the romance genre -- drawing benefit from his earlier ventures in that kind but going beyond them. For individual romance motifs, like the separation and reunion of lovers, the debt to the resources of the genre is plain enough. For the characteristic ideas and attitudes of romance the debt is less manifest, yet deeper. More fundamentally still, in overcoming the chief obstacles presented by romance to effective dramatization -- its diffuseness and its credulity -- Shakespeare does not evade or minimize them; instead, he exploits them to the fullest. R o m a n c e is indispensable to both structure and theme. I First, since "romance" is an elastic term, I list the main motifs and ideas which are characteristic of the genre and are exploited by Shakespeare for comedy. An inventory of motifs would include: duels, travels, wanderings, sea-journeys, storms, shipwrecks, exilings, disguises, monsters, fairies, philtres, poisons, oracles, riddles, hermits, courts, courtships,

Journal

ParergonAustralian & New Zealand Association of Medieval & Early Modern Studies, Inc. (ANAZAMEMS, Inc.)

Published: Apr 3, 1985

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