Resonances: Historical Essays on Continuity and Change ed. by Nils Holger Petersen, Eyolf Østrem, and Andreas Bücker (review)

Resonances: Historical Essays on Continuity and Change ed. by Nils Holger Petersen, Eyolf... Short Notices 333 which have -wulf (wolf) as their second element are more likely to be male, but it is also common as a first element in female names. Other frequently occurring first name-elements in female names which Osaka considers semantically inappropriate for women are Ecg- (sword), Here- (army/battle), and Sige- (victory). Pagan Anglo-Saxons, I presume, thought otherwise. To put that in other words, one of the ways in which we might come to an understanding of Anglo-Saxon naming practices is by discovering how they varied according to date and region. Fortunately, we can and should draw on the invaluable assistance of the online Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England, which can also help to determine whether the frequency of certain nameelements merely reflects the frequency with which particular individuals are named in the historical record. Stephanie Hollis Department of English The University of Auckland Petersen, Nils Holger, Eyolf Østrem, and Andreas Bücker, eds, Resonances: Historical Essays on Continuity and Change (Ritus et Artes, 5), Turnhout, Brepols, 2011; hardback; pp. x, 266; 12 b/w, 4 colour illustrations; R.R.P. 80.00; ISBN 9782503534930. The essays that comprise this volume are largely concerned with liturgical, theological, and spiritual topics. But beyond this ostensible http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Parergon Australian & New Zealand Association of Medieval & Early Modern Studies, Inc. (ANAZAMEMS, Inc.)

Resonances: Historical Essays on Continuity and Change ed. by Nils Holger Petersen, Eyolf Østrem, and Andreas Bücker (review)

Parergon, Volume 29 (2) – Feb 14, 2012

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Publisher
Australian & New Zealand Association of Medieval & Early Modern Studies, Inc. (ANAZAMEMS, Inc.)
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Copyright © The author
ISSN
1832-8334
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Abstract

Short Notices 333 which have -wulf (wolf) as their second element are more likely to be male, but it is also common as a first element in female names. Other frequently occurring first name-elements in female names which Osaka considers semantically inappropriate for women are Ecg- (sword), Here- (army/battle), and Sige- (victory). Pagan Anglo-Saxons, I presume, thought otherwise. To put that in other words, one of the ways in which we might come to an understanding of Anglo-Saxon naming practices is by discovering how they varied according to date and region. Fortunately, we can and should draw on the invaluable assistance of the online Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England, which can also help to determine whether the frequency of certain nameelements merely reflects the frequency with which particular individuals are named in the historical record. Stephanie Hollis Department of English The University of Auckland Petersen, Nils Holger, Eyolf Østrem, and Andreas Bücker, eds, Resonances: Historical Essays on Continuity and Change (Ritus et Artes, 5), Turnhout, Brepols, 2011; hardback; pp. x, 266; 12 b/w, 4 colour illustrations; R.R.P. 80.00; ISBN 9782503534930. The essays that comprise this volume are largely concerned with liturgical, theological, and spiritual topics. But beyond this ostensible

Journal

ParergonAustralian & New Zealand Association of Medieval & Early Modern Studies, Inc. (ANAZAMEMS, Inc.)

Published: Feb 14, 2012

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