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'Piers Plowman' and the Poor (review)

'Piers Plowman' and the Poor (review) delicate touch if the interests of the monarch, the church and those of the everimpatient Gothic aristocracy are to be disentangled. He believes that there was a constant confrontation between the kings, who sought to found dynasties, and the aristocrats and the church who favoured an elected monarch. He shows that although Isidore of Seville had in the early 620s reformulated kingship as service, Leovigild and Chindasvind were using Late Roman and Byzantine imagery to bolster the presentation of kingship as sacred. He also shows that there was a traditional form of the elective procedure ­ acclamation, acceptance after a ritual refusal, a delay of the ceremony of unction and then the rites of accession at Toledo. This included the taking of an oath to the people. The initial refusal was a necessary part of the candidate's behaviour, indicating that he was no dictator and would accept the position only because it was a duty. Julian's account of Wamba's unction was apparently the earliest extant in Western Europe. Its importance is underlined by the fact that the would-be usurper, Paul also styles himself `unctus rex orientalis'. This is an impressive and scholarly study of a critical document in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Parergon Australian & New Zealand Association of Medieval & Early Modern Studies, Inc. (ANAZAMEMS, Inc.)

'Piers Plowman' and the Poor (review)

Parergon , Volume 23 (2) – Jan 10, 2006

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Publisher
Australian & New Zealand Association of Medieval & Early Modern Studies, Inc. (ANAZAMEMS, Inc.)
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by the author.
ISSN
1832-8334
Publisher site
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Abstract

delicate touch if the interests of the monarch, the church and those of the everimpatient Gothic aristocracy are to be disentangled. He believes that there was a constant confrontation between the kings, who sought to found dynasties, and the aristocrats and the church who favoured an elected monarch. He shows that although Isidore of Seville had in the early 620s reformulated kingship as service, Leovigild and Chindasvind were using Late Roman and Byzantine imagery to bolster the presentation of kingship as sacred. He also shows that there was a traditional form of the elective procedure ­ acclamation, acceptance after a ritual refusal, a delay of the ceremony of unction and then the rites of accession at Toledo. This included the taking of an oath to the people. The initial refusal was a necessary part of the candidate's behaviour, indicating that he was no dictator and would accept the position only because it was a duty. Julian's account of Wamba's unction was apparently the earliest extant in Western Europe. Its importance is underlined by the fact that the would-be usurper, Paul also styles himself `unctus rex orientalis'. This is an impressive and scholarly study of a critical document in

Journal

ParergonAustralian & New Zealand Association of Medieval & Early Modern Studies, Inc. (ANAZAMEMS, Inc.)

Published: Jan 10, 2006

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