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Letters of Pope Gregory: A Study of an Unknown Tenth-Century Manuscript Bound in Tenbury and Found in Melbourne Containing all or part of Forty Letters sent by Pope Gregory the Great by John R. C. Martyn (review)

Letters of Pope Gregory: A Study of an Unknown Tenth-Century Manuscript Bound in Tenbury and... 258 Reviews but Marenbon goes far too deeply into obscurities regarding the dating of Abelard's works and his personal disbelief in the break-through offered brilliantly in Constant Mews's The Lost Love Letters of Heloise and Abelard (Palgrave Macmillan, 1999) is perplexing. The only Abelardian argument to receive any detailed treatment by Marenbon is termed `NAG' and represents the view that `God can do no other than he does'. This is a view few moderns would be interested in (and even contemporaries were sceptical). By p. 87, we have been taken through Abelard's argument here and the views of his opponents. Marenbon does so very competently indeed, but I am afraid that I find this territory uninteresting and out of touch with today's problems; I doubt it would tempt any person contemplating further work on Abelard to proceed. Marenbon's `four dimensions' seem to me to be somewhat platitudinous and they do not really succeed in taking the reader very far into the problem of dealing with past philosophers. Having offered a few such generalities, Marenbon chooses to look carefully at the relationship between Anselm and Abelard. Why pick Anselm, who, Marenbon claims, had not much influence on Abelard? Why http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Parergon Australian & New Zealand Association of Medieval & Early Modern Studies, Inc. (ANAZAMEMS, Inc.)

Letters of Pope Gregory: A Study of an Unknown Tenth-Century Manuscript Bound in Tenbury and Found in Melbourne Containing all or part of Forty Letters sent by Pope Gregory the Great by John R. C. Martyn (review)

Parergon , Volume 32 (1) – Sep 6, 2015

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Publisher
Australian & New Zealand Association of Medieval & Early Modern Studies, Inc. (ANAZAMEMS, Inc.)
Copyright
Copyright © The author
ISSN
1832-8334
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Abstract

258 Reviews but Marenbon goes far too deeply into obscurities regarding the dating of Abelard's works and his personal disbelief in the break-through offered brilliantly in Constant Mews's The Lost Love Letters of Heloise and Abelard (Palgrave Macmillan, 1999) is perplexing. The only Abelardian argument to receive any detailed treatment by Marenbon is termed `NAG' and represents the view that `God can do no other than he does'. This is a view few moderns would be interested in (and even contemporaries were sceptical). By p. 87, we have been taken through Abelard's argument here and the views of his opponents. Marenbon does so very competently indeed, but I am afraid that I find this territory uninteresting and out of touch with today's problems; I doubt it would tempt any person contemplating further work on Abelard to proceed. Marenbon's `four dimensions' seem to me to be somewhat platitudinous and they do not really succeed in taking the reader very far into the problem of dealing with past philosophers. Having offered a few such generalities, Marenbon chooses to look carefully at the relationship between Anselm and Abelard. Why pick Anselm, who, Marenbon claims, had not much influence on Abelard? Why

Journal

ParergonAustralian & New Zealand Association of Medieval & Early Modern Studies, Inc. (ANAZAMEMS, Inc.)

Published: Sep 6, 2015

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