System response time operator productivity, and job satisfaction

System response time operator productivity, and job satisfaction RESEARCH COKTfl/BUT/OHS Operator Pr :luctivib/, and Job Satisfaction RAYMONDE. BARBERand HENRYC. LUCAS,JR. New York University System ResponseTime Raymond E. Barber is currentlyDirectorof MIS at TRTTelecommunications in Washington, DC. Henry C. Lucas, It. is Professor and Chairman of the ComputerApplications and Information Systems Area at NYU. His research interests include implementation and the managerial and organizational problems in the use of information systems. Authors' Present Addresses: RaymondE. Barber, TRT TelecommunicationsCorp., 1405 G Street NW, Washington,DC 20005; Henry C. Lucas, Jr., Graduate School of BusinessAdmin., Computer Applicationsand InformationSystems Area, NYU, New York, NY 10006 Permissionto copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that the 1. INTRODUCTION Over the past several years, many companies have implemented on-line computer-based information systems. With each such implementation, previous manual or computerized batch processing methods used to process the same data are discontinued. Once this occurs, it is generally not possible to revert to the old procedures. The result is increased dependence upon on-line computer systems. With such dependencies and a growing community of online system operators, user groups have become increasingly sensitive to response time and system downtime. Slow or unavailable systems interfere with a group's productivity-the ability to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Communications of the ACM Association for Computing Machinery

System response time operator productivity, and job satisfaction

Loading next page...
 
/lp/association-for-computing-machinery/system-response-time-operator-productivity-and-job-satisfaction-NlTrtiMvDT
Publisher
Association for Computing Machinery
Copyright
Copyright © 1983 by ACM Inc.
ISSN
0001-0782
DOI
10.1145/182.358464
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

RESEARCH COKTfl/BUT/OHS Operator Pr :luctivib/, and Job Satisfaction RAYMONDE. BARBERand HENRYC. LUCAS,JR. New York University System ResponseTime Raymond E. Barber is currentlyDirectorof MIS at TRTTelecommunications in Washington, DC. Henry C. Lucas, It. is Professor and Chairman of the ComputerApplications and Information Systems Area at NYU. His research interests include implementation and the managerial and organizational problems in the use of information systems. Authors' Present Addresses: RaymondE. Barber, TRT TelecommunicationsCorp., 1405 G Street NW, Washington,DC 20005; Henry C. Lucas, Jr., Graduate School of BusinessAdmin., Computer Applicationsand InformationSystems Area, NYU, New York, NY 10006 Permissionto copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that the 1. INTRODUCTION Over the past several years, many companies have implemented on-line computer-based information systems. With each such implementation, previous manual or computerized batch processing methods used to process the same data are discontinued. Once this occurs, it is generally not possible to revert to the old procedures. The result is increased dependence upon on-line computer systems. With such dependencies and a growing community of online system operators, user groups have become increasingly sensitive to response time and system downtime. Slow or unavailable systems interfere with a group's productivity-the ability to

Journal

Communications of the ACMAssociation for Computing Machinery

Published: Nov 1, 1983

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month